Punch, or the London Charivari, Volume 1, Complete eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 1,359 pages of information about Punch, or the London Charivari, Volume 1, Complete.

[Illustration:  A N-ICE SITUATION.]

    [3] Sic, actually, in the dramatic article of that paper,
        Wednesday, 24th ult.

In fine, the farce is altogether a leaven of the best material most cleverly worked up.

* * * * *

A PERFECT VACUUM PROVED.

MR. HALSE, the gentleman who has during the last week been lecturing upon Animal Magnetism, having stated that one of his patients, while under the magnetic influence, could “see her own inside,” the Marquis of Londonderry, anxious to test the truth of the assertion, requested the lecturer to operate upon him, and being thrown into the Mesmeric sleep, looked into the inside of his own head, and declared he could see nothing in it.

* * * * *

A CON BY O’CONNER.

Why ought the Children of a Thief to be burnt?—­Because their Pa steals (they’re pastiles).

* * * * *

PUNCH, OR THE LONDON CHARIVARI.

VOL. 1.

FOR THE WEEK ENDING DECEMBER 11, 1841.

* * * * *

THE PHYSIOLOGY OF THE LONDON MEDICAL STUDENT.

11.—­HOW MR. MUFF CONCLUDES HIS EVENING.

[Illustration:  E]Essential as sulphuric acid is to the ignition of the platinum in an hydropneumatic lamp; so is half-and-half to the proper illumination of a Medical Student’s faculties.  The Royal College of Surgeons may thunder and the lecturers may threaten, but all to no effect; for, like the slippers in the Eastern story, however often the pots may be ordered away from the dissecting-room, somehow or other they always find their way back again with unflinching pertinacity.  All the world inclined towards beer knows that the current price of a pot of half-and-half is fivepence, and by this standard the Medical Student fixes his expenses.  He says he has given three pots for a pair of Berlin gloves, and speaks of a half-crown as a six-pot piece.

Mr. Muff takes the goodly measure in his hand, and decapitating its “spuma” with his pipe, from which he flings it into Mr. Simpson’s face, indulges in a prolonged drain, and commences his narrative—­most probably in the following manner:—­

“You know we should all have got on very well if Rapp hadn’t been such a fool as to pull away the lanthorns from the place where they are putting down the wood pavement in the Strand, and swear he was a watchman.  I thought the crusher saw us, and so I got ready for a bolt, when Manhug said the blocks had no right to obstruct the footpath; and, shoving down a whole wall of them into the street, voted for stopping to play at duck with them.  Whilst he was trying how many he could pitch across the Strand against the shutters opposite, down came the pewlice and off we cut.”

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Punch, or the London Charivari, Volume 1, Complete from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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