Punch, or the London Charivari, Volume 1, Complete eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 1,359 pages of information about Punch, or the London Charivari, Volume 1, Complete.

A great party mustered on Friday last, in the New Cut, to hear Mr. Briggles chant a new song, written on the occasion of the birth of the young Prince.  He was accompanied by his friend Mr. Handel Purcell Mozart Muggins on the drum and mouth-organ, who afterwards went round with his hat.

On Friday the lady of Paddy Green paid a morning call to Clare Market, at the celebrated tripe shop; she purchased two slices of canine comestibles which she carried home on a skewer.

Mrs. Paddy Green on Wednesday visited Mrs. Joel, to take tea.  She indulged in two crumpets and a dash of rum in the congou.  It is confidently reported that on Wednesday next Mrs. Joel will pay a visit to Mrs. G. at her residence in Vere-street, to supper; after which Mr. Paddy Green will leave for his seat in Maiden-lane.

Jeremiah Donovan, it is stated, is negotiating for the three-pair back room in Surrey, late the residence of Charles Mears, J.M.

* * * * *

FROM THE LONDON GAZETTE, Nov. 16th.

PROMOTIONS.—­POST OFFICE.

1st Body of
General Postmen—­Timothy Sneak, to Broad-street bell and bag,
vice Jabez Broadfoot, who retires into the
chandlery line.
" Horatio Squint to Lincoln’s-Inn bell and bag,
vice Timothy Sneak.
" Felix Armstrong to Bedford-square bell and bag,
vice Horatio Squint.
" Josiah Claypole (from the body of letter-sorters)
to Tottenham-Court-road bell and bag, vice
Felix Armstrong.  N.B.  This deserving young man
is indebted to his promotion for detecting a
brother letter-sorter appropriating the contents
of a penny letter to his own uses, at the
precise time that the said Josiah Claypole had
his eye on it, for reasons best known to himself. 
The twopenny-postmen are highly incensed at
this unheard-of and unprecedented passing them
over; and great fears are entertained of their
resignation.

* * * * *

FRENCH LIVING.

“Pa,” said an interesting little Polyglot, down in the West, with his French Rudiments before him, “why should one egg be sufficient for a dozen men’s breakfasts?”—­“Can’t say, child.”—­“Because un oeuf—­is as good as a feast.”—­“Stop that boy’s grub, mother, and save it at once; he’s too clever to live much longer.”

* * * * *

HINTS ON POPPING THE QUESTION.

    To the bashful, the hesitating, and the ignorant, the following
    hints may prove useful
.

Copyrights
Project Gutenberg
Punch, or the London Charivari, Volume 1, Complete from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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