Punch, or the London Charivari, Volume 1, Complete eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 1,359 pages of information about Punch, or the London Charivari, Volume 1, Complete.

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POOR JOHN BULL.

That knowing jockey Sir Robert Peel has stated that the old charger, John Bull, is, from over-feeding, growing restive and unmanageable—­kicking up his heels, and playing sundry tricks extremely unbecoming in an animal of his advanced age and many infirmities.  To keep down this playful spirit, Sir Robert proposes that a new burthen be placed upon his back in the shape of a house-tax, pledging himself that it shall be heavy enough to effect the desired purpose.  Commend us to these Tories—­they are rare fellows for

[Illustration:  BREAKING A HORSE.]

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A STRONG RESEMBLANCE.

Sir Edward Lytton Bulwer has frequently been accused of identifying himself with the heroes of his novels.  His late treatment at Lincoln leaves no doubt of his identity with

[Illustration:  THE DISOWNED.]

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A PRUDENT CHANGE.

“So Lord John Russell is married,” said one of the Carlton Club loungers to Colonel Sibthorp the other morning.  “Yes,” replied that gallant punster; “his Lordship is at length convinced that his talents will be better employed in the management of the Home than the Colonial department.”

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THE ABOVE-BRIDGE NAVY.

AN ARTICLE INTENDED FOR THE “QUARTERLY REVIEW,” BUT FALLEN INTO THE HANDS OF “PUNCH.”

I.—­Hours of the Starting of the Boats of the Iron Steam Boat Company.  London:  1841.

II.—­Notes of a Passenger on Board the Bachelor, during a Voyage from Old Swan Pier, London Bridge, to the Red House, Battersea.  CATNACH:  1840.

III.—­Rule Britannia, a Song.  London:  1694.

IV.—­Two Years before the Mast.  CUNNINGHAM.  London.

V.—­Checks issued by the London and Westminster Steam Boat Company
CATTARNS AND FRY.

At a time when the glory of England stands—­like a door shutting or opening either way—­entirely upon a pivot; when the hostile attitude of enemies abroad threatens not more, nor perhaps less, than the antagonistic posture of foes at home—­at such a time there is at least a yet undug and hitherto unexplored mine of satisfaction in the refreshing fact, that the Thames is fostering in his bosom an entirely new navy, calculated to bid defiance to the foe—­should he ever come—­in the very heart and lungs, the very bowels and vitals, the very liver and lungs, or, in one emphatic word, the very pluck of the metropolis.  There is not a more striking instance of the remarkable connexion between little—­very little—­causes, and great—­undeniably great—­effects,

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Punch, or the London Charivari, Volume 1, Complete from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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