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This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 258 pages of information about The Adventures of My Cousin Smooth.
all the attention of the establishment, deprived him of the opportunity of repairing to his banker’s for the purpose of enlarging his deposit.  Ordering an attendant to bring in the treaties of 1812, he added how sorry he was to give Madame Lacelooper, for whom he entertained the highest regard, so much trouble.  Legations were peculiarly situated at times, he said.  In reply to an intimation from the gentleman in waiting, he said, gentlemen of the diplomatic corps never paid in piecemeal.  Here Thomas would put an end to the comedy by announcing the arrival of the ‘Minister for Foreign Affairs,’ and politely bowing out the retiring gentleman, who, you may well imagine, maintained a reluctant gravity.  There was no end of these little diplomatic comediettas, while Bolt honored the mission with his presence, ending in what was long afterwards esteemed a capital joke, which, though somewhat against my feelings, I will confidentially relate.  Bolt had named a certain day when all his little affairs would positively be arranged, and this dawned of a calm and sunny autumn morning, when everything about the Legation seemed to repose in peace and quietness—­when wars and obdurate creditors were forgotten, and we plumed ourselves on the happy issue of several important international questions.  One very important member of the corps, however, seemed to have something of great importance evolving in his mind; this was the sagacious Thomas, who paced the hall with more than ordinary superciliousness, now and then arranging his livery in the mirror.  About eleven o’clock there came a great gathering of serious-looking individuals at the hall door; among them the quick eye of Thomas discovered the following very respectable gentlemen, viz.:—­Broadwood, of the firm of Broadwood & Willow; Dole, the distinguished wine merchant; Staple, the bootmaker; Madame Lacelooper’s man of business; and Peppers, the jeweller.  The opening of the door was succeeded by a great rush.  Having expressed some surprise at their mistake in calling so early, Thomas received his visitors with his customary equanimity, and begged to remind them that three o’clock was the hour appointed for the interview between themselves and Mr. Bolt.  Here he threw a sly wink at Peppers, which that gentleman rendered into an intimation to remain, while he politely bowed the remainder out.  ’Wonderful assurance, these fellows have,’ said Thomas, turning to Peppers, who began to think he was all right, ‘they won’t learn etiquette.’  As he concluded he turned to have a view through the side-light at his friends outside, who hung contemplatively about the door, then addressing the inside gentleman—­’Peppers, I think you said?’ he continued, working his lips and smoothing his chin with the fingers of his right hand.  That gentleman bowed affirmatively as Thomas advanced a few steps toward the parlor door, and then hesitated, as if in a deep study.  ’Peppers, Peppers, Peppers!’ he accented somewhat curiously, until the creditor had well nigh lost his patience in suspense.  ‘I beg your pardon, sir!’ (Thomas faced about with an entirely altered face), but, may I, ah!—­hem,—­you see; there is a small affair in the way, Mr. Peppers.  The truth is, Mr. Bolt has ceased his connection with this establishment.’

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