Life of Adam Smith eBook

John Rae (educator)
This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 458 pages of information about Life of Adam Smith.

Letter to Hume appointing him literary executor, 262.  Long residence in London, 263.  Assistance from Franklin, 264.  Recommendation of Adam Ferguson for Chesterfield tutorship, 266.  Hume’s proposal as to Smith taking Ferguson’s place in the Moral Philosophy chair, 266.  The British Coffee-House, 267.  Election to the Literary Club, 267.  Smith’s conversation, 268.  His alleged aversion to speak of what he knew, 269.  Attends William Hunter’s lectures, 271.  Letter to Cullen on freedom of medical instruction, 273.  Hume’s health, 280.  Smith’s zeal on the American question, 281.  Advocacy of colonial incorporation, 282.

CHAPTER XVIII

“THE WEALTH OF NATIONS”

Terms of publication and sales, 285.  Letter from Hume, 286.  Gibbon’s opinion, 287; Sir John Pringle’s, 288; Buckle’s, 288.  General reception, 288.  Fox’s quotation, 289.  Fox and Lauderdale’s conversation on Smith, 289.  Quotations in Parliament, 290.  Popular association of economics with “French principles,” 291.  Prejudice against free trade as a revolutionary doctrine, 291.  Editions of the book, 293.  Immediate influence of the book on English taxation, 294.

CHAPTER XIX

THE DEATH OF HUME

Smith and John Home meet Hume at Morpeth, 295.  The Dialogues on Natural Religion, 296.  Letter from Hume, 297.  Hume’s farewell dinner, 299.  Correspondence between Hume and Smith about the Dialogues, 300.  Hume’s death and monument in Calton cemetery, 302.  Correspondence of Smith with Home or Ninewells, 302.  Correspondence with Strahan on the Dialogues, 305.  Copy money for Wealth of Nations.  Strahan’s proposal to publish selection of Hume’s letters, 309.  Smith’s reply, 310.  Clamour raised by the letter to Strahan on Hume’s death, 311.  Bishop Horne’s pamphlet, 312.  Was Hume a Theist? 313.  Mackenzie’s “La Roche,” 314.

CHAPTER XX

LONDON AGAIN—­APPOINTED COMMISSIONER OF CUSTOMS

Mickle’s translation of the Lusiad, 316.  His causeless resentment against Smith, 317.  Governor Pownall, 318.  Letter of Smith to Pownall, 319.  Appointed Commissioner of Customs, 320.  Lord North’s indebtedness to the Wealth of Nations, 320.  Salary of post, 321.  Correspondence with Strahan, 321.

CHAPTER XXI

IN EDINBURGH

Panmure House, Canongate, 325; Windham on, 326.  Sunday suppers, 327.  Smith’s library, 327.  His personal appearance, 329.  Work in the Custom House, 330.  Anecdotes of absence of mind, 330.  Devotion to Greek and Latin classics, 333.  The Oyster Club, 334.  Dr. Black and Dr. Hutton, 336.

CHAPTER XXII

VARIOUS CORRESPONDENCE IN 1778

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Life of Adam Smith from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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