The Relations Between Religion and Science eBook

Frederick Temple
This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 140 pages of information about The Relations Between Religion and Science.
of Revelation.  The students of the Bible will certainly learn that Revelation need not fear the discoveries of Science, not even such doctrines as that of Evolution.  And the students of nature will certainly learn that Science has nothing to fear from the teaching of Revelation, not even from the claim to miraculous power.  For most certainly both Science and Revelation come from one and the same God; ’the heavens declare His glory, and the firmament showeth His handywork; His law is perfect, converting the soul; His testimony is sure, making wise the simple.’

LECTURE VIII.

THE CONCLUSION OF THE ARGUMENT.

Uniformity of nature not demonstrated, but established, except in two cases; the interference of human will and of Divine Will.  The exception no bar to the progress of Science.  Unity to be found not in the physical world, but in the physical and moral combined.  The Moral Law rests on itself.  Our recognition of it on our own character and choice.  But we expect it to show its marks in the physical world:  and these are the purpose visible in Creation, the effects produced by Revelation.  Nevertheless a demand for more physical evidence; but the physical cannot be allowed to overshadow the spiritual.  Dangers to believers from leaning this way:  superstition; blindness; stagnation.  The guarantee for spiritual perceptiveness:  to take Jesus as the Lord of the conscience, the heart, the will.

LECTURE VIII.

THE CONCLUSION OF THE ARGUMENT.

     ‘No man can say that Jesus is the Lord, but by the Holy Ghost.’
     1 Cor. xii. 3.

It is now the proper time to review the argument of these Lectures, and to endeavour to trace, if possible, the source of the estrangement which just at present separates Religion and Science.

The postulate of Science is admitted on all hands to be the uniformity of nature, and the proof of this postulate has been found to consist in an induction from the facts which nature presents and our senses observe.  Uniformity is quickly noticed, and after it has been noticed for some time it is instinctively used as a working hypothesis.  So used it accumulates perpetually increasing evidence of its truth, and if we except two great classes of facts, we never find any instance of its failure.  The two classes of facts which are thus excepted are the acts of the human will and the miraculous element in Revelation, both of them instances of one thing, namely, the interference of the moral with the physical.  To complete the induction and to deprive the denial of universal uniformity of all evidence to rest on, all that is necessary is to get rid of these two exceptions.  If Science could get rid of these exceptions, though it could not be said that the fundamental postulate was demonstrated, it could be said that all the evidence was in its

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The Relations Between Religion and Science from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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