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Frederick Temple
This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 140 pages of information about The Relations Between Religion and Science.
And this progress rests on the fixed rules by which his nature is governed, and which admit of the character being gradually changed by the life.  The Christian knows that God has so made us that a temptation once overcome is permanently weakened, and often overcome is at last altogether expelled; that appetites restrained are in the end subdued and cost but little effort to keep down; that bad thoughts perpetually put aside at last return no more; that a clearer perception of duty and a more resolute obedience to its call makes duty itself more attractive, fills us with enthusiasm for its fulfilment, draws us as it were upwards, and ennobles the whole man.  The Christian knows that the thought of the Supreme Being, the contemplation of His excellency, the recognition of Him as the source of spiritual life has a strange power to transform, and evermore to transform the whole man.  In this knowledge the Christian lives his life and fights his battle.  And what is this but a knowledge that he has a nature subject to fixed laws, which he can indeed interfere with, but without which his self-discipline would be of little value, and assuredly could not long continue.

And if the progress of Science and the examination of human nature should eventually restrict more closely than we might have supposed the length to which the interference of the will can go; if it should appear that the changes which we can make at any one moment in ourselves are within a very narrow range, this, too, will be knowledge that can be used in our self-discipline and quite as much perhaps in our mutual moral aid.  It is conceivable that the branch of science which treats of human nature may in the end profoundly modify our modes of education, and our hopes of what can be effected by it.  But if so the knowledge will only add to the store of means put within our reach for the elevation of our race.  And we may be sure that nothing of this sort will really affect the revelation that God has written in our souls that we are free and responsible beings, and cannot get quit of our responsibility.

LECTURE IV.

APPARENT CONFLICT BETWEEN RELIGION AND THE DOCTRINE OF EVOLUTION.

Foundation of the doctrine of Evolution.  Great development in recent times.  Objection felt by many religious men.  Alleged to destroy argument from design.  Paley’s argument examined.  Doctrine of Evolution adds force to the argument, and removes objections to it.  Argument from progress; from beauty; from unity.  The conflict not real.

LECTURE IV.

APPARENT CONFLICT BETWEEN RELIGION AND THE DOCTRINE OF EVOLUTION.

     ’For the invisible things of Him from the creation of the world are
     clearly seen, being understood by the things that are made, even
     His eternal power and Godhead.’ Romans i. 20.

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