New England Salmon Hatcheries and Salmon Fisheries in the Late 19th Century eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 51 pages of information about New England Salmon Hatcheries and Salmon Fisheries in the Late 19th Century.
E. B. Hodge, commissioner, Plymouth, N.H....................40,000 Cold Spring Harbor, N. Y., for New York Commission..........60,000 Plymouth, N. H., for Vermont Commission ....................25,000 Plymouth, N. H., for Lake Memphremagog .....................25,000 Central Station, Washington, D.C. ..........................10,000 R. E. Earll, World’s Exposition, New Orleans ................5,000 G. W. Delawder, commissioner, Baltimore .....................5,000 Myron Battles, North Creek, N................................5,000 A. R. Fuller, Meacham Lake, N. .............................20,000
F. Mather for transmission to Europe as follows: 
For Herr von Behr, Germany..................................40,000
For Tay Fishery Board, Scotland.............................20,000
For National Fish Culture Association, England..............30,000
Total to Europe........................................
.....90,000
Enfield, Maine for Maine Commission.........................58,000
Total..................................................
....608,000

A few of the shipments have been heard from, and these all reached their destinations safely.

BUCKSPORT, ME.  March 31, 1885

ARTICLE VI

METHODS EMPLOYED AT CRAIG BROOK STATION IN REARING YOUNG SALMONID FISHES

By Charles G. Atkins, Superintendent U. S. Fish Commission Station at Craig Brook, Maine.

Bulletin of the United States Fish Commission, Vol. 13, Pages 221-228, 1893.

The station of the U. S. Fish Commission at Craig Brook was founded in 1889, on the same site where, in 1871, the first attempt at the artificial spawning of salmon in the United States was made.  This site had been selected by the commissioners of fisheries of the States of Maine, Massachusetts, and Connecticut for that experiment because of its proximity to the salmon fisheries of the Penobscot River and the facilities presented for the maturing of the spawn that might be obtained.

The collection of spawn has been carried on in the vicinity annually from 1871 to the present time, with the exception of the three years 1876,1877, and 1878, and since 1879 the development of the spawn has been conducted constantly at Craig Brook.  No attempt was, however, made to rear the fry of any species until 1886.  Two years later it was definitely determined to found a permanent station at Craig Brook, and in 1889 the purchase of the grounds was effected and permanent improvements begun.

The station is located in the town of Orland, Me., 7 miles east of Bucksport, a seaport on the Penobscot River.  Its territory embraces a tract of land extending between Allamoosook Lake and Craig Pond and embracing within its limits the entire length of Craig Brook, which connects those two bodies of water.  Its latitude is about 44 degrees 42’ N. The mean annual temperature and precipitation are believed

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New England Salmon Hatcheries and Salmon Fisheries in the Late 19th Century from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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