New England Salmon Hatcheries and Salmon Fisheries in the Late 19th Century eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 51 pages of information about New England Salmon Hatcheries and Salmon Fisheries in the Late 19th Century.

If conveyance overland is necessary, a wooden tank 3 feet long, 2 feet wide, and 2 feet deep, with a sliding cover, will take six salmon at a time for a mile and perhaps farther, and they may be jolted along over a rough road in comparative safety.

It has been our uniform experience that all the salmon that survive till autumn were in normal condition as to their reproductive function, and yielded healthy spawn and milt.  On two occasions we suffered serious losses of eggs.  In neither instance could the loss be attributed to any defect in the inclosure, but on one occasion the conclusion was reached that the water which was well suited to the maintenance of the fish was injurious to the eggs, rendering the shell so soft that they could not be transported safely.

With the exception of the disasters enumerated above, there has been but one that I can recall, and that was caused by the bursting of our barriers at Dead Brook under the pressure of a flood.

BUCKSPORT, ME, April 7, 1884.

ARTICLE V

REPORT ON THE SCHOODIC SALMON WORK OF 1884-85

By Charles G. Atkins.

Bulletin of the United States Fish Commission, Vol. 5, Pages 324-325, 1885.

The measurement of the stock of Schoodic salmon eggs at Grand Lake Stream at time of packing and shipment, and the record of previous losses, enable me to complete the statistics, as follows: 

Original number taken ...................................1,820,810
The total losses up to that time, including the
unfertilized, which were removed before packing............254,410
Net stock of sound eggs..................................1,566,400
Reserved for Grand Lake....................................397,400
Available for shipment to subscribers ...................1,169,000

These were divided among the parties supplying the funds for the work in proportion to their contributions, as follows: 

Allotted to the United States Commission...................608,000
Allotted to the Maine Commission...........................234,000
Allotted to the Massachusetts Commission...................187,000
Allotted to the New Hampshire Commission...................140,000
Total..................................................
..1,169,000

The share of the United States Commission was assigned and shipped, under orders, as follows: 

A. W. Aldrich, commissioner, Anamosa, Iowa..................50,000
E. A. Brackett, commissioner, Winchester, Mass..............25,000
H. H. Buck, Orland, Me, to be hatched for
Eagle Lake, Mount Desert....................................20,000
Paris, Mich., for Michigan commission.......................50,000
Madison, Wis., for Wisconsin commission.....................50,000
R. O. Sweeny, commissioner, Saint Paul, Minn ...............50,000
South Bend, Nebr., for Nebraska Commission..................20,000


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New England Salmon Hatcheries and Salmon Fisheries in the Late 19th Century from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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