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This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 154 pages of information about Gulliver's Travels.

[Illustration]

I stayed but two months with my wife and family; for my insatiable desire of seeing foreign countries would suffer me to continue no longer.  I left fifteen hundred pounds with my wife and fixed her in a good house at Redriff.  My remaining stock I carried with me, part in money, and part in goods, in hopes to improve my fortune.  My eldest uncle, John, had left me an estate in land, near Epping, of about thirty pounds a year; and I had a long lease of the “Black Bull[39],” in Fetter Lane, which yielded me as much more:  so that I was not in any danger of leaving my family upon the parish.  My son Johnny, named so after his uncle, was at the grammar-school, and a towardly[40] child.  My daughter Betty (who is now well married, and has children), was then at her needlework.  I took leave of my wife and boy and girl, with tears on both sides, and went on board the “Adventure,” a merchant ship of three hundred tons, bound for Surat, Captain John Nicholas, of Liverpool, commander.  But my account of this voyage must be referred to the second part of my travels.

THE END OF THE FIRST PART.

[Illustration:  “THEY CONCLUDED ...  THAT I WAS ONLY Relplum Scalcath,” P. 37.]

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TRAVELS.

* * * * *

PART II.

A VOYAGE TO BROBDINGNAG.

* * * * *

CHAPTER I.

     A GREAT STORM DESCRIBED; THE LONG-BOAT SENT TO FETCH WATER; THE
     AUTHOR GOES WITH IT TO DISCOVER THE COUNTRY.  HE IS LEFT ON SHORE,
     IS SEIZED BY ONE OF THE NATIVES, AND CARRIED TO A FARMER’S HOUSE. 
     HIS RECEPTION, WITH SEVERAL ACCIDENTS THAT HAPPENED THERE.  A
     DESCRIPTION OF THE INHABITANTS.

Having been condemned by nature and fortune to an active and restless life, in two months after my return I again left my native country, and took shipping in the Downs on the twentieth day of June, 1702, in the “Adventure,” Captain John Nicholas, a Cornish man, commander, bound for Surat.  We had a very prosperous gale till we arrived at the Cape of Good Hope, where we landed for fresh water; but, discovering a leak, we unshipped our goods and wintered there:  for, the captain falling sick of an ague, we could not leave the Cape till the end of March.  We then set sail, and had a good voyage till we passed the Straits of Madagascar;[41] but having got northward of that island, and to about five degrees south latitude, the winds, which in those seas are observed to blow a constant equal gale, between the north and west, from the beginning of December to the beginning of May, on the nineteenth of April began to blow with much greater violence and more westerly than usual, continuing so for twenty days together, during which time we were driven a little to the east of the Molucca

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