Forgot your password?  

Resources for students & teachers

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 160 pages of information about About Orchids.
until we reached the Savannah, when we had to send them back several times to get the balance of our goods.  From the time we reached the Savannah we were starving, more or less, as we could procure only very little provisions.  We hunted all about for Catt.  Lawrenceana, and got only about 1500 or so, it growing only here and there.  At Roraima we did not hunt at all, as the district is utterly rubbed out by the Indians.  We were about fourteen days at Roraima and got plenty of Utricularia Campbelliana, U.  Humboldtii, and U. montana.  Also Zygopetalum, Cyp.  Lindleyanum, Oncidium nigratum (only fifty—­very rare now), Cypripedium Schomburgkianum, Zygopetalum Burkeii, and in fact, all that is to be found on and about Roraima, except the Cattleya Lawrenceana.  Also plenty others, as Sobralia, Liliastrum, etc.  So our collection was not a very great one; we had the hardest trouble now through the want of Indians to carry the loads.  Besides this, the rainy weather set in and our loads suffered badly for all the care we took of them.  Besides, the Indians got disagreeable, having to go back several times to bring the remaining baskets.  Nevertheless, we got down as far as the Curubing mountains.  Up to this time we were more or less always starving.  Arrived at the Curubing mountains, procured a scant supply of provisions, but lost nearly all of them in a small creek, and what was saved was spoiling under our eyes, it being then that the rainy season had fully started, drenching us from morning to night.  It took us nine days to get our loads over the mountain, where our boat was to reach us to take us down river.  And we were for two and a half days entirely without food.  Besides the plants being damaged by stress of weather, the Indians had opened the baskets and thrown partly the loads away, not being able to carry the heavy soaked-through baskets over the mountains, so making us lose the best of our plants.

Arrived at our landing we had to wait for our boat, which arrived a week later in consequence of the river being high, and, of course, short of provisions.  Still, we got away with what we had of our loads until we reached the first gold places kept by a friend of mine, who supplied us with food.  Thereafter we started for town.  Halfway, at Kapuri falls (one of the most dangerous), we swamped down over a rock, and so we lost some of our things; still saved all our plants, though they lay for a few hours under water with the boat.  After this we reached town in safety.  So after coming home we found, on packing up, that we had only about 900 plants, that is, Cattleya Lawrenceana, of which about one-third good, one-third medium, and one-third poor quality.  This trip took us about three and a half months, and cost over 2500 dollars.  Besides, I having poisoned my leg on a rotten stump which I run up in my foot, lay for four months suffering terrible pain.

Follow Us on Facebook