The Tale of Mrs. Tittlemouse eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 4 pages of information about The Tale of Mrs. Tittlemouse.

FREDERICK WARNE

Penguin Books Ltd, Harmondsworth, Middlesex, England
Viking Penguin Inc., 40 West 23rd Street, New York, New York 10010, U.S.A. 
Penguin Books Australia Ltd, Ringwood, Victoria, Australia
Penguin Books Canada Ltd, 2801 John Street, Markham, Ontario, Canada L3R 1B4
Penguin Books (N.Z.) Ltd, 182-190 Wairau Road, Auckland 10, New Zealand

First published 1910
This impression 1985
Universal Copyright Notice: 
Copyright (C) 1910 by Frederick Warne & Co. 
Copyright in all countries signatory to the Berne Convention

All rights reserved.  Without limiting the rights under copyright reserved above, no part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in or introduced into a retrieval system, or transmitted, in any form or by any means (electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise), without the prior written permission of both the copyright owner and the above publisher of this book.

Printed and bound in Great Britain by
William Clowes Limited, Beccles and London

NELLIE’S LITTLE BOOK

[Illustration:  Mrs. Tittlemouse at the Door]

Once upon a time there was a wood-mouse, and her name was Mrs.
Tittlemouse.

She lived in a bank under a hedge.

Such a funny house!  There were yards and yards of sandy passages, leading to storerooms and nut-cellars and seed-cellars, all amongst the roots of the hedge.

[Illustration:  In the pantry]

[Illustration:  In bed]

There was a kitchen, a parlour, a pantry, and a larder.

Also, there was Mrs. Tittlemouse’s bedroom, where she slept in a little box bed!

Mrs. Tittlemouse was a most terribly tidy particular little mouse, always sweeping and dusting the soft sandy floors.

Sometimes a beetle lost its way in the passages.

“Shuh! shuh! little dirty feet!” said Mrs. Tittlemouse, clattering her dust-pan.

[Illustration:  Shooing a beetle]

[Illustration:  A ladybird]

And one day a little old woman ran up and down in a red spotty cloak.

“Your house is on fire, Mother Ladybird!  Fly away home to your children!”

Another day, a big fat spider came in to shelter from the rain.

“Beg pardon, is this not Miss Muffet’s?”

“Go away, you bold bad spider!  Leaving ends of cobweb all over my nice clean house!”

[Illustration:  Spider]

[Illustration:  Out the window]

She bundled the spider out at a window.

He let himself down the hedge with a long thin bit of string.

Mrs. Tittlemouse went on her way to a distant storeroom, to fetch cherry-stones and thistle-down seed for dinner.

All along the passage she sniffed, and looked at the floor.

Copyrights
Project Gutenberg
The Tale of Mrs. Tittlemouse from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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