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Albert Samuel Gatschet
This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 13 pages of information about Illustration Of The Method Of Recording Indian Languages.

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DETAILS OF A CONJURER’S PRACTICE.

IN THE KLAMATH LAKE DIALECT.  OBTAINED FROM MINNIE FROBEN, BY A.S.  GATSCHET.

M[a][k=]laks|shu[a]kiuk|k[i]uksash|[k=][a
]-i|g[^u]’l[’]hi| Indians |in calling | the | not | enter | conjurer
|h[u]nk[)e]lam|l[a]dshashtat,|nd[e]na
|      his     |  into lodge,  |  they 
halloo
sha’hm[o]knok;|k[i]ush toks|w[a]n|kiuk[a]yank|m[^u]’luash|m[’]na|
to call (him) | the conjurer|  red | hanging out|  as sign  |  his |
out;                       fox    on a pole
|kan[i]ta|p[^i]’sh.
| outside |"of him.”
Kuk[i]aks|tch[^u]’tanish|g[a]tp[’]na
nk|wig[a]ta|tch[e]l[x]a| Conjurers| when treating| approaching | close by| sit down |
|m[=a]’shipksh.|L[u]tatkish    3
| the patient. |The expounder
wig[a]ta|k[i]uksh[)e]sh|tcha[’]hl[a]ns
hna.|Shuy[e]ga| close to| the conjurer | sits down. | Starts | choruses
|  k[i]uks,  |w[e]wanuish
|the conjurer,|  females
tch[=i]k|win[o]ta|liuki[a]mnank| nadsh[=a]’shak |
then   | join in |   crowding   | simultaneously |
singing    around him
|tch[^u]tchtn[i]shash.|H[a]nshna
|   while he treats    |He sucks
(the sick).
m[=a]’shish|h[^u]’nk|hishu[a]kshash,|t[
a]tktish|[^i]’shkuk,| diseased | that | man, |the disease|to extract,|
|hantch[i]pka|tc[=i]’k
| he sucks out| then
kuku[a]ga,|wishink[a]ga,|m[^u]’lkaga,|[k=]
[a][k=]o|g[^i]’ntak,| a small | small snake, | small | bone | after- | frog, insect, wards,
|k[a]haktok|n[a]nuktua
| whatsoever| anything
nshendshk[a]ne.|Ts[’][^u]’ks|toks| k[e]-usht|tch[e]k[)e]le|[i]tkal;|
small.     |   A leg    |    |   being   |  the (bad)   |   he    |
fractured      blood      extracts;
|l[u]lp|toks|m[=a]’-    3
| eyes  | but| be-
shisht |tch[e]k[)e]litat|lg[^u]’m|sh[^u]&rsquo
;k[)e]lank|[k=][^i]’tua| ing sore| into blood | coal | mixing | he pours | eyes,
|l[^u]’lpat,|k[^u]’tash|tchish
|  into the |  a louse | too
ksh[e]wa|l[u]lpat|p[^u]’klash|tui[x][a
]mpgatk|lt[u]i[x]aktgi g[i]ug. introduces| into the| the white | protruding | for eating out. eye of eye

NOTES.

583, 1. shu[a]kia does not mean to “_call on somebody_” generally, but only “_to call on the conjurer_ or medicine man”.

583, 2. w[a]n stands for w[a]nam n[=i]’l:  the fur or skin of a red or silver fox; kan[i]ta p[^i]’sh stands for kan[i]tana l[a]tchash m’n[a]lam:  “outside of his lodge or cabin”.  The meaning of the sentence is:  they raise their voices to call him out.  Conjurers are in the habit of fastening a fox-skin outside of their lodges, as a business sign, and to let it dangle from a rod stuck out in an oblique direction.

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