Illustration Of The Method Of Recording Indian Languages eBook

Albert Samuel Gatschet
This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 13 pages of information about Illustration Of The Method Of Recording Indian Languages.

586, 7.  Shi[u]lakiank etc.  For developing steam the natives collect only such stones for heating as are neither too large nor too small; a medium size seeming most appropriate for concentrating the largest amount of heat.  The old sweat-lodges are surrounded with large accumulations of stones which, to judge from their blackened exterior, have served the purpose of generating steam; they weigh not over 3 to 5 pounds in the average, and in the vicinity travelers discover many small cairns, not over four feet high, and others lying in ruins.  The shrubbery around the sudatory is in many localities tied up with willow wisps and ropes.

586, 11.  Spukli-u[a]pka m[=a]’ntch means that the sweating-process is repeated many times during the five days of observance; they sweat at least twice a day.

* * * * *

A DOG’S REVENGE.

A DAKOTA FABLE, BY MICHEL RENVILLE.  OBTAINED BY REV.  S.R.  RIGGS.

[S]u[ng]ka|wa[ng];|[k.]a |waka[ng]ka |wa[ng]|wa[k.]i[ng]|wa[ng]|
Dog     |  a;   | and  | old-woman |  a   |   pack    |  a   |
|ta[ng]ka| hnaka.   |U[ng]kan
| large  |laid away.| And
[s]u[ng]ka|[k.]o[ng]| he |sdonya.|U[ng]ka[ng]|wa[ng]na|ha[ng]yetu,|
dog     | the     |that| knew. |   And     |  now   |  night,   |
|u[ng]ka[ng]|waka[ng]ka
|   and     | old-woman
i[s]tinman|ke[c]i[ng]|[k.]a| en  | ya:  |tuka|waka[ng]ka|ki[ng]|
asleep   | he thought| and |there|went:| but| old woman| the  |
|sdonkiye|[c.]a|kiktaha[ng]     3
| knew   | and  | awake
wa[ng]ke,|[c.]a| ite |hdaki[ng]ya[ng]| ape  |[c.]a|ki[c]akse,|
lay,   | and  |face |   across      |struck| and  | gashed,   |
|[c.]a|nina|  po,   | keyapi.
| and  |much|swelled,|they say.
U[ng]ka[ng]|ha[ng][.h]a[ng]na|heha[ng]|[s]u[ng]ka|t
oke[c]a|wa[ng]| And | morning | then | dog | another | a |
| en  | hi, |[k.]a|  okiya     | ya.
|there|came,| and |to-talk-with|went.
Tuka|pamahdeda[ng]| ite| mahen| inina|ya[ng]ka.|U[ng]ka[ng]|taku|
But| head-down   |face|within|silent|  was.   |   And     |what|
|i[c]ante|ni[s]i[c]a
| of-heart| you-bad
heci[ng]ha[ng]|omakiyaka wo,|  eya.  |U[ng]ka[ng],|Inina |
if       |  me-tell,   |he-said.|   And,     |still |
|ya[ng]ka wo,|waka[ng]ka     3
| old-woman
wa[ng]|te[.h]iya|omaki[.h]a[ng] do,|  eya,  | keyapi. |U[ng]ka[ng],|
a   | hardly  |  me-dealt-with,  |he-said,|they say.|   And,     |
|Toke[ng]|ni[c]i[.h]a[ng] he,| eya.
|  How   |  to-thee-did-she,  |he-said.
U[ng]ka[ng],|Wa[k.]in| wa[ng]|ta[ng]ka| hnaka e     |wa[ng]mdake|[c.]a|
And,     | Pack   |   a   | large  |she-laid-away|  I-saw    | and  |
| heo[ng] |  otpa   | awape: 
|therefore|to-go-for|I waited: 
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Illustration Of The Method Of Recording Indian Languages from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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