Of the Orthographie and Congruitie of the Britan Tongue eBook

Alexander Hume
This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 46 pages of information about Of the Orthographie and Congruitie of the Britan Tongue.

Ida, Scotland or Edinburgh, p. 2. 
Incurre, v. = to run into.  Lat. incurro, pp. 20, 33.

Ken = know, p. 21. 
Kep, v. = to intercept, p. 14. 
Kepping = receiving in the act of falling, p. 12. Jamieson.
Knau = know, p. 2. 
Knaulege = knowledge, pp. 3, 10;
  knawlege, pp. 11, 21. 
Knaw = know, pp. 7, 30;
  knawe, p. 21;
  knawen = known, p. 29.

Laggared = loitered or rested, p. 2. 
Lang = long, pp. 9, 14. 
Leave = live, p. 32. 
Leve = live, pp. 32, 34. 
Leving = living, p. 11. 
Louse = loose, p. 9. 
Lykwayes = likewise, p. 19.

Maer = more, pp. 2, 10. 
Maest = most, pp. 1, 2, 16. 
Man = must, p. 8. 
Mare = more, p. 30. 
Mast = most, pp. 30, 32. 
Meer = mare, p. 28. 
Middes = middle, p. 16. 
Mikle = much, pp. 13, 18, 19, 20. 
Mint = aim, pressure, p. 18. 
Minted = attempted, p. 15. 
Moat, probably moot, discussion, chat, etc., p. 2.  A.S. m{o’}t
Moe = more, pp. 16, 19, 21, 27. 
Moien = means for attaining an end, p. 2. Jamieson. Fr. moyen
Mont = mount, p. 24. 
Montan = mountain, pp. 3, 11, 28. 
Mynt = aim, pp. 12, 17.

Nae = no, pp. 1, 8. 
Nane = none, p. 13. 
Noat, v. = note, pp. 19, 22, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 33. 
Noat = note, pp. 7, 13, 28, 29;
  noate, p. 28;
  noates = notes, p. 29. 
Nor = than, p. 3. 
Nor, God nor, p. 31. 
    This most probably means God comfort or nourish us, connected with
    norice, a nurse, and norie, a foster-child.  There is also a
    substantive nore in Chaucer, meaning comfort. Norne is to
    entreat, ask (see Alliterative Poems Glossary), and may have
    something to do with this expression, but it is hardly so probable
    as the above. 
Noute = black cattle, p. 27;
    connected with neat, as in neat-cattle, neat-herd. 
Nulleth = negatives, p. 33. 
Nurice = nurse, p. 19.

Of = off, p. 23. 
Ones, at ones = at once, p. 18.

Paen = trouble, p. 2. 
Paert = part, p. 10. 
Peple = people, pp. 20, 29. 
Phason = pheasant (?), p. 13. 
Pover = poor, p. 3. 
Punct = stop, p. 34.

Qu. 
    At p. 18 the author gives his reasons for making use of the guttural
    qu in the place of the labial w.  The following are the words in
    which it is thus used:—­
Quha = who, pp. 2, 3, 34. 
Quhae = who, pp. 1, 10;
  quhae’s = whose, p. 2. 
Quhaer = where, p. 2. 
Quhar = where, p. 29. 
Quharein = wherein, p. 14. 
Quharof = whereof, p. 16. 
Quhat = what, pp. 2, 8, 15, 17, 18, 28. 
Quhatever = whatever, p. 19. 
Quhen = when, pp. 2, 9, 11, 23, 31. 
Quhence = whence, pp. 29, 32. 
Quher = where, pp. 2, 14, 20, 32. 
Quheras = whereas, p. 14. 
Quherat = whereat, p. 18. 

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Of the Orthographie and Congruitie of the Britan Tongue from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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