History of the United States eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 731 pages of information about History of the United States.

13.  What was the nature of the opposition in England to the war?

14.  Give the events connected with the peace settlement; the terms of peace.

=Research Topics=

=The Spirit of America.=—­Woodrow Wilson, History of the American People, Vol.  II, pp. 98-126.

=American Rights.=—­Draw up a table showing all the principles laid down by American leaders in (1) the Resolves of the First Continental Congress, Macdonald, Documentary Source Book, pp. 162-166; (2) the Declaration of the Causes and the Necessity of Taking Up Arms, Macdonald, pp. 176-183; and (3) the Declaration of Independence.

=The Declaration of Independence.=—­Fiske, The American Revolution, Vol.  I, pp. 147-197.  Elson, History of the United States, pp. 250-254.

=Diplomacy and the French Alliance.=—­Hart, American History Told by Contemporaries, Vol.  II, pp. 574-590.  Fiske, Vol.  II, pp. 1-24.  Callender, Economic History of the United States, pp. 159-168; Elson, pp. 275-280.

=Biographical Studies.=—­Washington, Franklin, Samuel Adams, Patrick Henry, Thomas Jefferson—­emphasizing the peculiar services of each.

=The Tories.=—­Hart, Contemporaries, Vol.  II, pp. 470-480.

=Valley Forge.=—­Fiske, Vol.  II, pp. 25-49.

=The Battles of the Revolution.=—­Elson, pp. 235-317.

=An English View of the Revolution.=—­Green, Short History of England, Chap.  X, Sect. 2.

=English Opinion and the Revolution.=—­Trevelyan, The American Revolution, Vol.  III (or Part 2, Vol.  II), Chaps.  XXIV-XXVII.

PART III.  THE UNION AND NATIONAL POLITICS

CHAPTER VII

THE FORMATION OF THE CONSTITUTION

THE PROMISE AND THE DIFFICULTIES OF AMERICA

The rise of a young republic composed of thirteen states, each governed by officials popularly elected under constitutions drafted by “the plain people,” was the most significant feature of the eighteenth century.  The majority of the patriots whose labors and sacrifices had made this possible naturally looked upon their work and pronounced it good.  Those Americans, however, who peered beneath the surface of things, saw that the Declaration of Independence, even if splendidly phrased, and paper constitutions, drawn by finest enthusiasm “uninstructed by experience,” could not alone make the republic great and prosperous or even free.  All around them they saw chaos in finance and in industry and perils for the immediate future.

Copyrights
Project Gutenberg
History of the United States from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
Follow Us on Facebook