History of the United States eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 731 pages of information about History of the United States.

15.  State the principal results of the war.

16.  Compare Lincoln’s plan of reconstruction with that adopted by Congress.

17.  What rights did Congress attempt to confer upon the former slaves?

=Research Topics=

=Was Secession Lawful?=—­The Southern view by Jefferson Davis in Harding, Select Orations Illustrating American History, pp. 364-369.  Lincoln’s view, Harding, pp. 371-381.

=The Confederate Constitution.=—­Compare with the federal Constitution in Macdonald, Documentary Source Book, pp. 424-433 and pp. 271-279.

=Federal Legislative Measures.=—­Prepare a table and brief digest of the important laws relating to the war.  Macdonald, pp. 433-482.

=Economic Aspects of the War.=—­Coman, Industrial History of the United States, pp. 279-301.  Dewey, Financial History of the United States, Chaps.  XII and XIII.  Tabulate the economic measures of Congress in Macdonald.

=Military Campaigns.=—­The great battles are fully treated in Rhodes, History of the Civil War, and teachers desiring to emphasize military affairs may assign campaigns to members of the class for study and report.  A briefer treatment in Elson, History of the United States, pp. 641-785.

=Biographical Studies.=—­Lincoln, Davis, Lee, Grant, Sherman, and other leaders in civil and military affairs, with reference to local “war governors.”

=English and French Opinion of the War.=—­Rhodes, History of the United States, Vol.  IV, pp. 337-394.

=The South during the War.=—­Rhodes, Vol.  V, pp. 343-382.

=The North during the War.=—­Rhodes, Vol.  V, pp. 189-342.

=Reconstruction Measures.=—­Macdonald, Source Book, pp. 500-511; 514-518; 529-530; Elson, pp. 786-799.

=The Force Bills.=—­Macdonald, pp. 547-551; 554-564.

PART VI.  NATIONAL GROWTH AND WORLD POLITICS

CHAPTER XVI

THE POLITICAL AND ECONOMIC EVOLUTION OF THE SOUTH

The outcome of the Civil War in the South was nothing short of a revolution.  The ruling class, the law, and the government of the old order had been subverted.  To political chaos was added the havoc wrought in agriculture, business, and transportation by military operations.  And as if to fill the cup to the brim, the task of reconstruction was committed to political leaders from another section of the country, strangers to the life and traditions of the South.

THE SOUTH AT THE CLOSE OF THE WAR

=A Ruling Class Disfranchised.=—­As the sovereignty of the planters had been the striking feature of the old regime, so their ruin was the outstanding fact of the new.  The situation was extraordinary.  The American Revolution was carried out by people experienced in the arts of self-government, and at its close they were free to follow the general course to which they had long been accustomed.  The French Revolution witnessed the overthrow of the clergy and the nobility; but middle classes who took their places had been steadily rising in intelligence and wealth.

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History of the United States from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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