Tacitus: The Histories, Volumes I and II eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 352 pages of information about Tacitus.

    [435] Thrasea, Helvidius’ father-in-law, was an honoured
          member of the Stoic opposition who had been executed by Nero
          A.D. 66.  Here Vitellius is posing as an ordinary senator.  If
          he had opposed so distinguished a man as Thrasea, why should
          not Helvidius oppose him?  Thrasea’s end gives the remark a
          slightly sinister tone.

    [436] See note 346.

    [437] A patron apparently could claim support from his
          freedmen if he was in want, as these restored exiles certainly
          were, since their property had been confiscated and was
          irrecoverable.  In exile they had of course lost their rights.

    [438] This probably includes bathing as well as drinking.

    [439] Since Tiberius there had been only nine, and Vespasian
          restored that number.

    [440] See i. 6.

    [441] Probably September 24.  He was 54.

    [442] Cp. i. 37, 49.

    [443] About nine million pounds.  Not to be taken too literally.

    [444] Valens.

    [445] Governor of Moesia (see chap. 85).

    [446] See chap. 67.

    [447] He had been left to guard the Rhine.

    [448] See chap. 57.  The revolt of Civilis was soon to break out.

    [449] See chap. 65.

    [450] Cluvius Rufus was governing the Tarragona division from
          Rome (chap. 65).  Lusitania was under a praetorian legate. 
          Baetica was a senatorial province with no troops.

    [451] See i. 7 and 11.

    [452] He had succeeded Clodius Macer in command of the Third
          Augusta, and in virtue of that command governed Numidia (see
          i. 7).

    [453] These ‘annual’ winds blew steadily and gently from July
          20 for a month.

    [454] Vespasian’s brother.

    [455] In Lower Germany.

    [456] Only two legions went to Cremona (see iii. 14).

    [457] Ostiglia.

    [458] Padua.

    [459] e.g.  Cluvius Rufus (cp. i. 8), the elder Pliny (cp. iii. 28),
          and Vipstanus Messala (cp. iii, 9, 25, 28).

    [460] i.e. at Hostilia, coming back from Padua.

Oxford:  Horace Hart, Printer to the University

* * * * *

TACITUS

THE HISTORIES

TRANSLATED WITH INTRODUCTION AND NOTES
BY
W. HAMILTON FYFE
FELLOW OF MERTON COLLEGE

IN TWO VOLUMES
VOLUME II

OXFORD
AT THE CLARENDON PRESS
1912

HENRY FROWDE
PUBLISHER TO THE UNIVERSITY OF OXFORD
LONDON, EDINBURGH, NEW YORK
TORONTO AND MELBOURNE

SUMMARY OF CHIEF EVENTS

Copyrights
Project Gutenberg
Tacitus: The Histories, Volumes I and II from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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