A Handbook for Latin Clubs eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 70 pages of information about A Handbook for Latin Clubs.

A NEW VERSION OF THE DEATH OF CAESAR.
  Harper’s Magazine.  Vol. cxv, p. 655.

POEM.—­The Lads of Liege.
  The Present Hour.  Percy Mackaye.  P. 35.
  New York Times.  Sept. 2, 1914.

CICERO

  “Caesar alone excepted, no ancient Roman has been so widely, so
  continuously, and so intensely alive since his death, as has been
  Marcus Tullius Cicero.” 
    —­Wilkinson

THE HOUSE WHERE CICERO WAS BORN.
  Roman Life in the Days of Cicero.  Alfred J. Church.  Chap. vi.

HIS FAVORITE HOUSE.
  Roman Life in the Days of Cicero.  Alfred J. Church.  P. 121.

CICERO, THE MAN. 
  Cicero.  John Lord. Chautauqua.  Vol. ii, p. 563.
  Foreign Classics in English.  William Cleaver Wilkinson.  Vol. iv. 
    Chap. vii.

CICERO, THE ORATOR.
  Cicero in the Senate.  Harriet Waters Preston. Atlantic
    Monthly
.  Vol. lxi, p. 641.

CICERO, THE WIT. 
  Cicero as a Wit.  W.L.  Collins. Chautauqua.  Vol. xi, P. 377. 
  Cicero as a Wit.  Francis W. Kelsey. Classical Journal.  Vol. iii,
    p. 3.
  Roman Life in the Days of Cicero.  Alfred J. Church.  P. 197.
  Foreign Classics in English.  William Cleaver Wilkinson, Vol. iv,
    p. 235. 
  Humor Repeats Itself.  Irene Nye. Classical Journal.  Vol. ix,
    p. 154.

CICERO, THE EXILE.
  Rome:  The Eternal City.  Clara Erskine Clement.  Vol. ii, p. 621.
  Roman Life in the Days of Cicero.  Alfred J. Church.  Chap. x.

THE PROSECUTION OF ARCHIAS. 
  Richard Wellington Husband. Classical Weekly.  Vol. ix, p. 165.

A COMPARISON:  CICERO AND DEMOSTHENES.
  Illustrated History of Ancient Literature.  John D. Quackenbos. 
    P. 286.
  Foreign Classics in English.  William Cleaver Wilkinson.  Vol. iv,
    p. 487.

CICERO IN MAINE. 
  Martha Baker Dunn. Atlantic Monthly.  Vol. xciii, p. 253.

DEBATE:  Resolved that Cicero was justified in putting the Catilinarian
conspirators to death. 
  The conviction of Lentulus.  H.C.  Nutting. Classical Journal
    Vol. iii, p. 186. 
  Catiline as a Party Leader.  E.S.  Beesly. Fortnightly Review
    Vol. i, p. 175.

THE DEATH OF CICERO.
  Rome:  The Eternal City.  Clara Erskine Clement.  Vol. ii, p. 624.

VERGIL

  “The noble sage who knew everything.” 
    —­Dante

SONG.—­Opening Lines of the Aeneid. 
  An Experiment with the Opening Lines of the Aeneid.  J. Raleigh
    Nelson. School Review.  Vol. vii, p. 129.
  Dido.  An Epic Tragedy.  Miller and Nelson.  P. 57.

VERGIL. 
  Outline for the Study of Vergil’s Aeneid.  Maud Emma Kingsley.
    Education.  Vol. xxiii, p. 148.
  Vergil.  Harper and Miller.  Introduction.

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A Handbook for Latin Clubs from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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