The Well at the World's End: a tale eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 674 pages of information about The Well at the World's End.

Then said Ralph:  “Good fellow, is this the Burg of the Four Friths?” The carle laughed, and said:  “Simple is the question, Sir Knight:  yonder is a watch-tower of the Burg, whereunder husbandmen can live, because there be men-at-arms therein.  And all round the outskirts of the Frank of the Burg are there such-like towers to the number of twenty-seven.  For that, say folk, was the tale of the winters of the Fair Lady who erewhile began the building of the Burg, when she was first wedded to the Forest Lord, who before that building had dwelt, he and his fathers, in thatched halls of timber here and there about the clearings of the wild-wood.  But now, knight, if thou wilt, thou mayest go on softly toward the Gate of the Burg, and if thou wilt I will walk beside thy rein, which fellowship, as aforesaid, shall be a gain to me.”

Said Ralph:  “I pray thee come with me, good fellow, and show me how easiest to enter this stronghold.”  So, when Falcon was well breathed, they went on, passing through goodly acres and wide meadows, with here and there a homestead on them, and here and there a carle’s cot.  Then came they to a thorp of the smallest on a rising ground, from the further end of which they could see the walls and towers of the Burg.  Thereafter right up to the walls were no more houses or cornfields, nought but reaches of green meadows plenteously stored with sheep and kine, and with a little stream winding about them.

CHAPTER 12

Ralph Entereth Into the Burg of the Four Friths

When they came up to the wall they saw that it was well builded of good ashlar, and so high that they might not see the roofs of the town because of it; but there were tall towers on it, a many of them, strong and white.  The road led up straight to the master-gate of the Burg, and there was a bailey before it strongly walled, and manned with weaponed men, and a captain going about amongst them.  But they entered it along with men bringing wares into the town, and none heeded them much, till they came to the very gate, on the further side of a moat that was both deep and clean; but as now the bridge was down and the portcullis up, so that the market-people might pass in easily, for it was yet early in the day.  But before the door on either side stood men-at-arms well weaponed, and on the right side was their captain, a tall man with bare grizzled head, but otherwise all-armed, who stopped every one whom he knew not, and asked their business.

As Ralph came riding up with Roger beside him, one of the guard laid his spear across and bade them stand, and the captain spake in a dry cold voice:  “Whence comest thou, man-at-arms?” “From the Abbey of St. Mary at Higham,” said Ralph.  “Yea,” said the captain, smiling grimly, “even so I might have deemed:  thou wilt be one of the Lord Abbot’s lily lads.”  “No I am not,” quoth Ralph angrily.  “Well, well,” said the captain, “what is thy name?”

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The Well at the World's End: a tale from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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