The Well at the World's End: a tale eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 674 pages of information about The Well at the World's End.

CHAPTER 4

They Ride the Wood Under the Mountains

When Ralph woke on the morrow it was broad day as far as the trees would have it so.  He rose at once, and looked about for his fellow, but saw her not, and for some moments of time he thought he had but dreamed of her; but he saw that the fire had been quickened from its embers, and close by lay the hauberk and strange-fashioned helm, and the sword of the damsel, and presently he saw her coming through the trees barefoot, with the green-sleeved silken surcoat hanging below the knees and her hair floating loose about her.  She stepped lightly up to Ralph with a cheerful smiling countenance and a ruddy colour in her cheeks, but her eyes moist as if she could scarce keep back the tears for joy of the morning’s meeting.  He thought her fairer than erst, and made as if he would put his arms about her, but she held a little aloof from him, blushing yet more.  Then she said in her sweet clear voice:  “Hail fellow-farer! now begins the day’s work.  I have been down yonder, and have found a bright woodland pool, to wash the night off me, and if thou wilt do in likewise and come back to me, I will dight our breakfast meantime, and will we speedily to the road.”  He did as she bade him, thinking of her all the while till he came back to her fresh and gay.  Then he looked to their horses and gave them fodder gathered from the pool-side, and so turned to Ursula and found her with the meat ready dight; so they ate and were glad.

When they had broken their fast Ralph went to saddle the horses, and coming back found Ursula binding up her long hair, and she smiled on him and said:  “Now we are for the road I must be an armed knight again:  forsooth I unbound my hair e’en now and let my surcoat hang loose about me in token that thou wottest my secret.  Soothly, my friend, it irks me that now we have met after a long while, I must needs be clad thus graceless.  But need drave me to it, and withal the occasion that was given to me to steal this gay armour from a lad at Utterbol, the nephew of the lord; who like his eme was half my lover, half my tyrant.  Of all which I will tell thee hereafter, and what wise I must needs steer betwixt stripes and kisses these last days.  But now let us arm and to horse.  Yet first lo you, here are some tools that in thine hands shall keep us from sheer famine:  as for me I am no archer; and forsooth no man-at-arms save in seeming.”

Therewith she showed him a short Turk bow and a quiver of arrows, which he took well pleased.  So then they armed each the other, and as she handled Ralph’s wargear she said:  “How well-wrought and trusty is this hauberk of thine, my friend; my coat is but a toy to it, with its gold and silver rings and its gemmed collar:  and thy plates be thick and wide and well-wrought, whereas mine are little more than adornments to my arms and legs.”

He looked on her lovingly and loved her shapely hands amidst the dark grey mail, and said:  “That is well, dear friend, for since my breast is a shield for thee it behoves it to be well covered.”  She looked at him, and her lips trembled, and she put out her hand as if to touch his cheek, but drew it back again and said:  “Come now, let us to horse, dear fellow in arms.”

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Project Gutenberg
The Well at the World's End: a tale from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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