The Well at the World's End: a tale eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 674 pages of information about The Well at the World's End.

BOOK THREE

The Road To The Well At World’s End.

CHAPTER 1

An Adventure in the Wood Under the Mountains

Now was the night worn to the time appointed, for it was two hours after midnight, so he stepped out of his tent clad in all his war gear, and went straight to the doddered oak, and found Redhead there with but one horse, whereby Ralph knew that he held to his purpose of going his ways to Utterbol:  so he took him by the shoulders and embraced him, rough carle as he was, and Redhead kneeled to him one moment of time and then arose and went off into the night.  But Ralph got a-horseback without delay and rode his ways warily across the highway and into the wood, and there was none to hinder him.  Though it was dark but for the starlight, there was a path, which the horse, and not Ralph, found, so that he made some way even before the first glimmer of dawn, all the more as the wood was not very thick after the first mile, and there were clearings here and there.

So rode Ralph till the sun was at point to rise, and he was about the midst of one of those clearings or wood-lawns, on the further side whereof there was more thicket, as he deemed, then he had yet come to; so he drew rein and looked about him for a minute.  Even therewith he deemed he heard a sound less harsh than the cry of the jay in the beech-trees, and shriller than the moaning of the morning breeze in the wood.  So he falls to listening with both ears, and this time deems that he hears the voice of a woman:  and therewith came into his mind that old and dear adventure of the Wood Perilous; for he was dreamy with the past eagerness of his deeds, and the long and lonely night.  But yet he doubted somewhat of the voice when it had passed his ears, so he shook his rein, for he thought it not good to tarry.

Scarce then had his horse stepped out, ere there came a woman running out of the thicket before him and made toward him over the lawn.  So he gat off his horse at once and went to meet her, leading his horse; and as he drew nigh he could see that she was in a sorry plight; she had gathered up her skirts to run the better, and her legs and feet were naked:  the coif was gone from her head and her black hair streamed out behind her:  her gown was rent about the shoulders and bosom, so that one sleeve hung tattered, as if by the handling of some one.

So she ran up to him crying out:  “Help, knight, help us!” and sank down therewith at his feet panting and sobbing.  He stooped down to her, and raised her up, and said in a kind voice:  “What is amiss, fair damsel, that thou art in such a plight; and what may I for thine avail?  Doth any pursue thee, that thou fleest thus?”

She stood sobbing awhile, and then took hold of his two hands and said:  “O fair lord, come now and help my lady! for as for me, since I am with thee, I am safe.”

Copyrights
Project Gutenberg
The Well at the World's End: a tale from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
Follow Us on Facebook