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This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 674 pages of information about The Well at the World's End.

Now the lady lifted up her face, and she was grown somewhat pale; but she forced her speech to come, and said:  “It is well, Lord, but now come thou into my pavilion, for thy meat is ready, and it lacketh but a minute or so of noon.”  So he took her hand and led her in to the pavilion, and all men got off their horses, and fell to pitching the tents and getting their meat ready; but Otter drew Ralph apart into a nook of the homestead, and there they ate their meat together.

CHAPTER 36

The Talk of Two Women Concerning Ralph

But when dinner was done, came David and a man with him bringing Ralph’s war gear, and bade him do it on, while the folk were fencing the lists, which they were doing with such stuff as they had at the Tower; and the Lord had been calling for Otter that he might command him what he should tell to the marshals of the lists and how all should be duly ordered, wherefore he went up unto the Tower whither the Lord had now gone.  So Ralph did on his armour, which was not right meet for tilting, being over light for such work; and his shield in especial was but a target for a sergeant, which he had brought at Cheaping Knowe; but he deemed that his deftness and much use should bear him well through.

Now, the Lady had abided in her pavilion when her Lord went abroad; anon after she sent all her women away, save one whom she loved, and to whom she was wont to tell the innermost of her mind; though forsooth she mishandled her at whiles; for she was hot of temper, and over-ready with her hands when she was angry; though she was nowise cruel.  But the woman aforesaid, who was sly and sleek, and somewhat past her first youth, took both her caresses and her buffets with patience, for the sake of the gifts and largesse wherewith they were bought.  So now she stood by the board in the pavilion with her head drooping humbly, yet smiling to herself and heedful of whatso might betide.  But the Lady walked up and down the pavilion hastily, as one much moved.

At last she spake as she walked and said:  “Agatha, didst thou see him when my Lord pointed him out?” “Yea,” said the woman lifting her face a little.

“And what seemed he to thee?” said the Lady.  “O my Lady,” quoth Agatha, “what seemed he to thee?” The lady stood and turned and looked at her; she was slender and dark and sleek; and though her lips moved not, and her eyes did not change, a smile seemed to steal over her face whether she would or not.  The Lady stamped her foot and lifted her hand and cried out.  “What! dost thou deem thyself meet for him?” And she caught her by the folds over her bosom.  But Agatha looked up into her face with a simple smile as of a child:  “Dost thou deem him meet for thee, my Lady—­he a thrall, and thou so great?” The Lady took her hand from her, but her face flamed with anger and she stamped on the ground again:  “What dost thou mean?” she said; “am

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