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This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 674 pages of information about The Well at the World's End.

Ralph rode with his brother to the hostel of the chapmen, and there they were well lodged.

CHAPTER 13

Richard Talketh With Ralph Concerning the Well at the World’s End.  Concerning Swevenham

On the morrow Blaise went to his chaffer and to visit the men of the Port at the Guildhall:  he bade Ralph come with him, but he would not, but abode in the hall of the hostel and sat pondering sadly while men came and went; but he heard no word spoken of the Well at the World’s End.  In like wise passed the next day and the next, save that Richard was among those who came into the hall, and he talked long with Ralph at whiles; that is to say that he spake, and Ralph made semblance of listening.

Now as is aforesaid Richard was old and wise, and he loved Ralph much, more belike than Lord Blaise his proper master, whereas he had no mind for chaffer, or aught pertaining to it:  so he took heed of Ralph and saw that he was sad and weary-hearted; so on the sixth day of their abiding at Whitwall, in the morning when all the chapmen were gone about their business, and he and Ralph were left alone in the Hall, he spake to Ralph and said:  “This is no prison, lord.”  “Even so,” quoth Ralph.  “Nay, if thou doubtest it,” said Richard, “let us go to the door and try if they have turned the key and shot the bolt on us.”  Ralph smiled faintly and stood up, and said:  “I will go with thee if thou willest it, but sooth to say I shall be but a dull fellow of thine to-day.”  Said Richard:  “Wouldst thou have been better yesterday, lord, or the day before?” “Nay,” said Ralph.  “Wilt thou be better to-morrow?” said Richard.  Ralph shook his head.  Said Richard:  “Yea, but thou wilt be, or thou mayst call me a fool else.”  “Thou art kind, Richard,” said Ralph; “and I will come with thee, and do what thou biddest me; but I must needs tell thee that my heart is sick.”  “Yea,” quoth Richard, “and thou needest not tell me so much, dear youngling; he who runs might read that in thee.  But come forth.”

So into the street they went, and Richard brought Ralph into the market-place, and showed him where was Blaise’s booth (for he was thriving greatly) but Ralph would not go anigh it lest his brother should entangle him in talk; and they went into the Guildhall which was both great and fair, and the smell of the new-shaven oak (for the roof was not yet painted) brought back to Ralph’s mind the days of his childhood when he was hanging about the building of the water-reeve’s new house at Upmeads.  Then they went into the Great Church and heard a Mass at the altar of St. Nicholas, Ralph’s very friend; and the said church was great to the letter, and very goodly, and somewhat new also, since the blossom-tide of Whitwall was not many years old:  and the altars of its chapels were beyond any thing for fairness that Ralph had seen save at Higham on the Way.

But when they came forth from the church, Ralph looked on Richard with a face that was both blank and weary, as who should say:  “What is to do now?” And forsooth so woe-begone he looked, that Richard, despite his sorrow and trouble for him, could scarce withhold his laughter.  But he said:  “Well, foster son (for thou art pretty much that to me), since the good town pleasureth thee little, go we further afield.”

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