The People of the Abyss eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 185 pages of information about The People of the Abyss.

And when at last I made into the East End, I was gratified to find that the fear of the crowd no longer haunted me.  I had become a part of it.  The vast and malodorous sea had welled up and over me, or I had slipped gently into it, and there was nothing fearsome about it—­with the one exception of the stoker’s singlet.

CHAPTER II—­JOHNNY UPRIGHT

I shall not give you the address of Johnny Upright.  Let it suffice that he lives in the most respectable street in the East End—­a street that would be considered very mean in America, but a veritable oasis in the desert of East London.  It is surrounded on every side by close-packed squalor and streets jammed by a young and vile and dirty generation; but its own pavements are comparatively bare of the children who have no other place to play, while it has an air of desertion, so few are the people that come and go.

Each house in this street, as in all the streets, is shoulder to shoulder with its neighbours.  To each house there is but one entrance, the front door; and each house is about eighteen feet wide, with a bit of a brick-walled yard behind, where, when it is not raining, one may look at a slate-coloured sky.  But it must be understood that this is East End opulence we are now considering.  Some of the people in this street are even so well-to-do as to keep a “slavey.”  Johnny Upright keeps one, as I well know, she being my first acquaintance in this particular portion of the world.

To Johnny Upright’s house I came, and to the door came the “slavey.”  Now, mark you, her position in life was pitiable and contemptible, but it was with pity and contempt that she looked at me.  She evinced a plain desire that our conversation should be short.  It was Sunday, and Johnny Upright was not at home, and that was all there was to it.  But I lingered, discussing whether or not it was all there was to it, till Mrs. Johnny Upright was attracted to the door, where she scolded the girl for not having closed it before turning her attention to me.

No, Mr. Johnny Upright was not at home, and further, he saw nobody on Sunday.  It is too bad, said I. Was I looking for work?  No, quite the contrary; in fact, I had come to see Johnny Upright on business which might be profitable to him.

A change came over the face of things at once.  The gentleman in question was at church, but would be home in an hour or thereabouts, when no doubt he could be seen.

Would I kindly step in?—­no, the lady did not ask me, though I fished for an invitation by stating that I would go down to the corner and wait in a public-house.  And down to the corner I went, but, it being church time, the “pub” was closed.  A miserable drizzle was falling, and, in lieu of better, I took a seat on a neighbourly doorstep and waited.

And here to the doorstep came the “slavey,” very frowzy and very perplexed, to tell me that the missus would let me come back and wait in the kitchen.

Copyrights
Project Gutenberg
The People of the Abyss from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
Follow Us on Facebook