Memoir, Correspondence, And Miscellanies, From The Papers Of Thomas Jefferson, Volume 1 eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 704 pages of information about Memoir, Correspondence, And Miscellanies, From The Papers Of Thomas Jefferson, Volume 1.
thirty-three miles, done the whole injury, and retired.  Their numbers, from the best intelligence I have had, are about fifteen hundred infantry, and as to their cavalry, accounts vary from fifty to one hundred and twenty; and the whole commanded by the parricide Arnold.  Our militia, dispersed over a large tract of country, can be called in but slowly.  On the day the enemy advanced to this place, two hundred only were embodied.  They were of this town and its neighborhood, and were too few to do any thing.  At this time, they are assembled in pretty considerable numbers on the south side of James river, but are not yet brought to a point.  On the north side are two or three small bodies, amounting in the whole to about nine hundred men.  The enemy were, at four o’clock yesterday evening, still remaining in their encampment at Westover and Berkeley Neck.  In the mean while, Baron Steuben, a zealous friend, has descended from the dignity of his proper command, to direct our smallest movements.  His vigilance has in a great measure supplied the want of force in preventing the enemy from crossing the river, which might have been very fatal.  He has been assiduously employed in preparing equipments for the militia, as they should assemble, in pointing them to a proper object, and in other offices of a good commander.  Should they loiter a little longer, and he be able to have a sufficient force, I still flatter myself they will not escape with total impunity.  To what place they will point their next exertions, we cannot even conjecture.  The whole country on the tide waters and some distance from them, is equally open to similar insult.

I have the honor to be, with every sentiment of respect,

your Excellency’s most obedient

and most humble servant,

Th:  Jefferson.

LETTER XXXVII.—­TO THE PRESIDENT OF CONGRESS, Jan. 15, 1781

TO HIS EXCELLENCY THE PRESIDENT OF CONGRESS.

Richmond, January 15,1781.

Sir,

As the dangers which threaten our western frontiers, the ensuing spring, render it necessary that we should send thither Colonel Crocket’s battalion, at present on guard at Fredericktown, but raised for the western service, I thought it necessary to give your Excellency previous information thereof, that other forces may be provided in time to succeed to their duties.  Captain Read’s troop of horse, if necessary, may be continued a while longer on guard.

I have the honor to be, with the greatest respect,

your Excellency’s most obedient

and most humble servant,

Th:  Jefferson.

LETTER XXXVIII.—­TO THE PRESIDENT OF CONGRESS, Jan. 15, 1781

TO HIS EXCELLENCY THE PRESIDENT OF CONGRESS.

Sir,

Richmond, January 15, 1781.

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