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George MacKinnon Wrong
This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 232 pages of information about A Canadian Manor and Its Seigneurs.

LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS

Colonel John Nairne Frontispiece
(From the Oil Painting in the Manor House at Murray Bay.)
          
                                                  Page

Cap A L’AIGLE from the west shore of Murray bay 6 (From the Water Colour by the late L.R.  O’Brien, in the possession of the Hon. Edward Blake, K.C.)

View across Murray bay from the Cap A L’AIGLE shore 21 (From an Oil Painting by E. Wyly Grier, in the possession of the Hon. Edward Blake.)

General James Murray 35
(From an Oil Painting preserved in the General’s Family.)

The manor house at Murray bay 74
(From amateur photographs.)

View from Pointe au pic up Murray bay 102 (From a Water Colour by the late L.R.  O’Brien in the possession of the Hon. Edward Blake.)

The golf links at Murray bay 237
(From a Photograph by W. Notman and Son, Montreal.)

MAPS

THE ST. LAWRENCE FROM QUEBEC TO MURRAY BAY 1

Sketch map of lake Ontario and the river st. Lawrence to
illustrate the war of 1812-14 148

[Illustration:  The st. Lawrence from Quebec to Murray bay]

A Canadian Manor and Its Seigneurs

CHAPTER I

THE FOUNDING OF MALBAIE

The situation of Malbaie.—­The physical features of Malbaie.—­Jacques Cartier at Malbaie.—­Champlain at Malbaie.—­The first seigneur of Malbaie.—­A new policy for settling Canada.—­The Sieur de Comporte, seigneur of Malbaie, sentenced to death in France.—­His career in Canada.—­His plans for Malbaie.—­Hazeur, Seigneur of Malbaie.—­Malbaie becomes a King’s Post.—­A Jesuit’s description of Malbaie in 1750.—­The burning of Malbaie by the British in 1759.

If one is not in too great a hurry it is wise to take the steamer—­not the train—­at Quebec and travel by it the eighty miles down the St. Lawrence to Malbaie, or Murray Bay, as the English call it, somewhat arrogantly rejecting the old French name used since the pioneer days of Champlain.  This means an early morning start and six or seven hours—­the steamers are not swift—­on

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