Verses for Children eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 69 pages of information about Verses for Children.
not attending to me. 
Now look here, Grethel, I think I have made up my mind that we won’t
go far;
For we can have a house, and I can be master of it just as well where
we are. 
Under the stairs would be a good place for a house for us if there’s
room. 
It’s very dirty, but you’re the housewife now, and you must sweep it
out well with the broom. 
I shall expect you to keep my house very comfortable, and have my meals
ready when there’s anything to eat;
And when Nickel and I come back from playing outside, you may peep out
and pretend you’re watching for us coming up the street. 
You’ve kept your apple, I see—­I’ve eaten mine—­well, it will be
something to make a start,
And I’ll put by some of my cake, if you’ll keep some of yours, and
remember Nickel must have part. 
I call it your cake and your apple, but of course now you’re my
housewife everything belongs to me;
But I shall give you the management of it, and you must make it go as
far as you can amongst three. 
And if you make nice feasts every day for me and Nickel, and never
keep us waiting for our food,
And always do everything I want, and attend to everything I say, I’m
sure I shall almost always be good. 
And if I am naughty now and then, it’ll most likely be your fault;
and, if it isn’t, you mustn’t mind;
For even if I seem to be cross, you ought to know that I mean to be
kind. 
And I’m sure you’ll like combing Nickel’s hair for my sake; it’ll be
something for you to do, and it bothers me so! 
But it must be done regularly, for if it’s not, his curls tangle into
lugs as they grow. 
I think that’s all, dear Grethel, for I love you so much that I’m sure
to be easy to please. 
Only remember—­it’s a trifle—­but when I want you, never keep that
headless doll on your knees. 
I’d much rather not have her in my house—­there, don’t cry! if you
will have her, I suppose it must be;
Though I can’t think what you want with Katerina when you’ve got
Nickel and me.” 
So I said, “Thank you, dear Fritz, for letting me bring her, for I’ve
had her so long I shouldn’t like to part with her now;
And I’ll try and do everything you want as well as I can, now you’ve
told me how.” 
But next morning I heard Fritz’s garret-window open, and he put out
his head,
And shouted, “Grethel!  Grethel!  I want you.  Be quick!  Haven’t you got
out of bed?”
I ran to the window and said, “What is it, dear Fritz?” and he said,
“I want to tell you that I’ve changed my mind. 
Hans-Wandermann is here, and he says there are real sapphires on the
beach; so I’m off to see what I can find.” 
“Oh, Fritz!” I said, “can’t I come too?” but he said, “You’d better
not, you’ll only be in the way. 
You can stop quietly at home with Katerina, and you may have Nickel
too, if he’ll stay.” 
But Nickel wouldn’t.  I give him far more of my cake than Fritz does,
but he likes Fritz better than me. 
So dear Katerina and I had breakfast together on the leads under the
old myrtle tree.

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Verses for Children from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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