Eveline Mandeville eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 209 pages of information about Eveline Mandeville.
the wound was accounted for on strictly honorable grounds; but people understood the matter; and when, the second day, his remains were borne to the tomb, people shook their heads, but kept their lips compressed.  If his children could grow up honest men, the crime for which their father died should never be imputed to them, or cast reproach upon their after lives.  Then, too, it would not do to speak too plainly about a man’s being killed, as it might lead to unpleasant consequences in after years, perhaps; for men were acting unlawfully in thus defending their property with arms.

These things caused still more active and energetic measures to be adopted by the Anti-League.  A vigilance committee was appointed, consisting at first of three, and afterward of five men, who were to serve one month, and then be relieved by other five, each member taking his turn, until all had served.  The duty of this committee was to keep a constant watch upon the movements of all suspected characters; and when a horse was stolen, to follow up the thief until, if possible, the offender was taken and the horse recovered.  ’Squire Williams volunteered to serve on this committee as one of the first five, and four others joined themselves with him.  For himself, without naming his suspicions to any one, he kept an eye upon Duffel’s movements, resolved, if he was guilty, to prove him so, by the collection of such facts as would convict him in a court of justice.  The neighbor who was with him on the night of the attack became his companion on the committee, and took upon himself the task of watching Bill and Dick.  This arrangement was made the day after the thieves had been shot at; so that while Duffel was busy making his arrangements with the members of the Thief League, in anticipation of a speedy removal of the head quarters of operations to another part of the country, and while Bill and Dick were busy with their plans of villainy, having in view the defeat of Duffel and the possession of Eveline, the committee were also busy, endeavoring by the most active and vigilant efforts, conducted at the same time with great celerity, to circumvent the villains; not that they knew the particular plots and counter-plots that were going on among the common enemy, for of these they were ignorant; but they were determined to hunt them up and stop their depredations.

Thus it will be seen that the elements are at work; and from the determined character of all the operators and their great desire to have things done speedily, we may expect stirring times.

CHAPTER XVII.

HADLEY.

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Eveline Mandeville from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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