The Golden Asse eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 242 pages of information about The Golden Asse.
Thiestes, Tereus and Progne signifieth the wicked and abhominable facts wrought and attempted by mortall men.  The fall of Icarus is an example to proud and arrogant persons, that weeneth to climb up to the heavens.  By Mydas, who obtained of Bacchus, that all things which he touched might be gold, is carped the foul sin of avarice.  By Phaeton, that unskilfully took in hand to rule the chariot of the Sunne, are represented those persons which attempt things passing their power and capacity.  By Castor and Pollux, turned into a signe in heaven called Gemini, is signified, that vertuous and godly persons shall be rewarded after life with perpetuall blisse.  And in this feined jest of Lucius Apuleius is comprehended a figure of mans life, ministring most sweet and delectable matter, to such as shall be desirous to reade the same.  The which if your honourable lordship shall accept ant take in good part, I shall not onely thinke my small travell and labour well employed, but also receive a further comfort to attempt some more serious matter, which may be more acceptable to your Lordship:  desiring the same to excuse my rash and bold enterprise at this time, as I nothing doubt of your Lordships goodnesse.  To whome I beseech Almighty God to impart long life, with encrease of much honour.

From Vniversity Colledge in Oxenforde, the xviij. of September, 1566.

Your Honours most bounden,

WilAdlington.

The Life of Lucius Apuleius Briefly Described

Lucius apuleius African, an excellent follower of Plato his sect, born in Madaura, a Countrey sometime inhabited by the Romans, and under the jurisdiction of Syphax, scituate and lying on the borders of Numidia and Getulia, whereby he calleth himself half a Numidian and half a Getulian:  and Sidonius named him the Platonian Madaurence:  his father called Theseus had passed all offices of dignity in his countrey with much honour.  His mother named Salvia was of such excellent vertue, that she passed all the Dames of her time, borne of an ancient house, and descended from the philosopher Plutarch, and Sextus his nephew.  His wife called Prudentila was endowed with as much vertue and riches as any woman might be.  Hee himselfe was of an high and comely stature, gray eyed, his haire yellow, and a beautiful personage.  He flourished in Carthage in the time of Iolianus Avitus and Cl.  Maximus Proconsuls, where he spent his youth in learning the liberall sciences, and much profited under his masters there, whereby not without cause hee calleth himself the Nource of Carthage, and the celestial Muse and venerable mistresse of Africke.  Soone after, at Athens (where in times past the well of all doctrine flourished) he tasted many of the cups of the muses, he learned the Poetry, Geometry, Musicke, Logicke, and the universall knowledge of Philosophy, and studied not in vaine the nine Muses, that is to say, the nine noble and royal disciplines.

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The Golden Asse from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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