The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 316 pages of information about The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes.

“That note only reached her yesterday,” said Holmes.

“Good God!  What a week she must have spent!”

“The police have watched this Lascar,” said Inspector Bradstreet, “and I can quite understand that he might find it difficult to post a letter unobserved.  Probably he handed it to some sailor customer of his, who forgot all about it for some days.”

“That was it,” said Holmes, nodding approvingly; “I have no doubt of it.  But have you never been prosecuted for begging?”

“Many times; but what was a fine to me?”

“It must stop here, however,” said Bradstreet.  “If the police are to hush this thing up, there must be no more of Hugh Boone.”

“I have sworn it by the most solemn oaths which a man can take.”

“In that case I think that it is probable that no further steps may be taken.  But if you are found again, then all must come out.  I am sure, Mr. Holmes, that we are very much indebted to you for having cleared the matter up.  I wish I knew how you reach your results.”

“I reached this one,” said my friend, “by sitting upon five pillows and consuming an ounce of shag.  I think, Watson, that if we drive to Baker Street we shall just be in time for breakfast.”

VII.  THE ADVENTURE OF THE BLUE CARBUNCLE

I had called upon my friend Sherlock Holmes upon the second morning after Christmas, with the intention of wishing him the compliments of the season.  He was lounging upon the sofa in a purple dressing-gown, a pipe-rack within his reach upon the right, and a pile of crumpled morning papers, evidently newly studied, near at hand.  Beside the couch was a wooden chair, and on the angle of the back hung a very seedy and disreputable hard-felt hat, much the worse for wear, and cracked in several places.  A lens and a forceps lying upon the seat of the chair suggested that the hat had been suspended in this manner for the purpose of examination.

“You are engaged,” said I; “perhaps I interrupt you.”

“Not at all.  I am glad to have a friend with whom I can discuss my results.  The matter is a perfectly trivial one”—­he jerked his thumb in the direction of the old hat—­“but there are points in connection with it which are not entirely devoid of interest and even of instruction.”

I seated myself in his armchair and warmed my hands before his crackling fire, for a sharp frost had set in, and the windows were thick with the ice crystals.  “I suppose,” I remarked, “that, homely as it looks, this thing has some deadly story linked on to it—­that it is the clue which will guide you in the solution of some mystery and the punishment of some crime.”

“No, no.  No crime,” said Sherlock Holmes, laughing.  “Only one of those whimsical little incidents which will happen when you have four million human beings all jostling each other within the space of a few square miles.  Amid the action and reaction of so dense a swarm of humanity, every possible combination of events may be expected to take place, and many a little problem will be presented which may be striking and bizarre without being criminal.  We have already had experience of such.”

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The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.