The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 316 pages of information about The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes.

“I saw it in a paper,” explained the American.  “It gave the name and the church but not where the lady lived.”

“Then we had a talk as to what we should do, and Frank was all for openness, but I was so ashamed of it all that I felt as if I should like to vanish away and never see any of them again—­just sending a line to pa, perhaps, to show him that I was alive.  It was awful to me to think of all those lords and ladies sitting round that breakfast-table and waiting for me to come back.  So Frank took my wedding-clothes and things and made a bundle of them, so that I should not be traced, and dropped them away somewhere where no one could find them.  It is likely that we should have gone on to Paris to-morrow, only that this good gentleman, Mr. Holmes, came round to us this evening, though how he found us is more than I can think, and he showed us very clearly and kindly that I was wrong and that Frank was right, and that we should be putting ourselves in the wrong if we were so secret.  Then he offered to give us a chance of talking to Lord St. Simon alone, and so we came right away round to his rooms at once.  Now, Robert, you have heard it all, and I am very sorry if I have given you pain, and I hope that you do not think very meanly of me.”

Lord St. Simon had by no means relaxed his rigid attitude, but had listened with a frowning brow and a compressed lip to this long narrative.

“Excuse me,” he said, “but it is not my custom to discuss my most intimate personal affairs in this public manner.”

“Then you won’t forgive me?  You won’t shake hands before I go?”

“Oh, certainly, if it would give you any pleasure.”  He put out his hand and coldly grasped that which she extended to him.

“I had hoped,” suggested Holmes, “that you would have joined us in a friendly supper.”

“I think that there you ask a little too much,” responded his Lordship.  “I may be forced to acquiesce in these recent developments, but I can hardly be expected to make merry over them.  I think that with your permission I will now wish you all a very good-night.”  He included us all in a sweeping bow and stalked out of the room.

“Then I trust that you at least will honour me with your company,” said Sherlock Holmes.  “It is always a joy to meet an American, Mr. Moulton, for I am one of those who believe that the folly of a monarch and the blundering of a minister in far-gone years will not prevent our children from being some day citizens of the same world-wide country under a flag which shall be a quartering of the Union Jack with the Stars and Stripes.”

“The case has been an interesting one,” remarked Holmes when our visitors had left us, “because it serves to show very clearly how simple the explanation may be of an affair which at first sight seems to be almost inexplicable.  Nothing could be more natural than the sequence of events as narrated by this lady, and nothing stranger than the result when viewed, for instance, by Mr. Lestrade of Scotland Yard.”

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The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.