Elizabeth Fry eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 194 pages of information about Elizabeth Fry.
on some return of insanity, was to leave Charles Lamb.  ’On one occasion Mr. Charles Lloyd met them slowly pacing together a little foot-path in Hoxton Fields, both weeping bitterly, and found, on joining them, that they were taking their solemn way to the accustomed asylum.’  What pathos is there not here?”—­New York Times.
“This life was worth writing, for all records of weakness conquered, of pain patiently borne, of success won from difficulty, of cheerfulness in sorrow and affliction, make the world better.  Mrs. Gilchrist’s biography is unaffected and simple.  She has told the sweet and melancholy story with judicious sympathy, showing always the light shining through darkness.”—­Philadelphia Press.

Sold by all Booksellers.  Mailed, post-paid, on receipt of the price, by the Publishers,

ROBERTS BROTHERS, BOSTON.

MARGARET FULLER’S WORKS AND MEMOIRS.

WOMAN IN THE NINETEENTH CENTURY, and kindred papers relating to the Sphere, Condition, and Duties of Woman.  Edited by her brother, ARTHUR B. FULLER, with an Introduction by HORACE GREELEY.  In 1 vol. 16mo. $1.50.

ART, LITERATURE, AND THE DRAMA. 1 vol. 16mo. $1.50.

LIFE WITHOUT AND LIFE WITHIN; or, Reviews, Narratives, Essays, and
Poems. 1 vol. 16mo. $1.50.

AT HOME AND ABROAD; or, Things and Thoughts in America and Europe, 1 vol. 16mo. $1.50.

MEMOIRS OF MARGARET FULLER OSSOLI.  By RALPH WALDO EMERSON, WILLIAM HENRY CHANNING, and JAMES FREEMAN CLARKE.  With Portrait and Appendix. 2 vols. 16mo. $3.00.

MARGARET FULLER will be remembered as one of the “Great Conversers,” the “Prophet of the Woman Movement” in this country, and her Memoirs will be read with delight as among the tenderest specimens of biographical writing in our language.  She was never an extremist.  She considered woman neither man’s rival nor his foe, but his complement.  As she herself said, she believed that the development of one could not be affected without that of the other.  Her words, so noble in tone, so moderate in spirit, so eloquent in utterance, should not be forgotten by her sisters.  Horace Greeley, in his introduction to her “Woman in the Nineteenth Century,” says:  “She was one of the earliest, as well as ablest, among American women to demand for her sex equality before the law with her titular lord and master.  Her writings on this subject have the force that springs from the ripening of profound reflection into assured conviction.  It is due to her memory, as well as to the great and living cause of which she was so eminent and so fearless an advocate, that what she thought and said with regard to the position of her sex and its limitations should be fully and fairly placed before the public.”  No woman who wishes to understand the full scope of what is called the woman’s movement should fail to read
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Elizabeth Fry from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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