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This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 227 pages of information about The Ladies' Work-Book.

14th:  X 8 plain, 1 bead, 4 plain, 3 beads, 5 plain, 2 beads, 2 plain, X.

15th:  X 8 plain, 1 bead, 3 plain, 1 bead, 1 plain, 3 beads, 3 plain, 3 beads, 2 plain X.

16th:  X 9 plain, 3 beads, 3 plain, 3 beads, 2 plain, 3 beads, 2 plain X.

17th:  X 16 plain, 6 beads, 3 plain, X.

18th:  X 6 plain, 1 bead, 10 plain, 5 beads, 3 plain X.

19th:  X 6 plain, 3 beads, 8 plain, 5 beads, 3 plain X.

20th:  X 6 plain, 6 beads, 3 plain, 7 beads, 3 plain X.

21st:  X 6 plain, 5 beads, 2 plain, 10 beads, 2 plain X.

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ANTI-MACASSAR.

MATERIALS.—­Brooks’ Great Exhibition Prize Goat’s-head Crochet Cotton,
No. 24.

This anti-macassar must be begun on the line of d.c., forming one end.  Make a chain of the required number of stitches, including the borders, and work the whole anti-macassar, except the border which is at the one end, below the foundation chain, which must be done last of all.  Or the centre can be done entirely first, and the border worked all round afterwards, increasing at the corners.  We, however, recommend the former method.

This pattern is extremely well adapted for darning on square netting.  In that case the netting may be done in Brooks’ Knitting Cord, No. 60, and the darning in Embroidery Cotton, No. 70.  The centre only can be done thus—­a netted border must trim it.

[Illustration:  ANTI-MACASSAR.]

* * * * *

NETTED ANTI-MACASSAR.

[Illustration:  NETTED ANTI-MACASSAR.]

MATERIALS.—­Brooks’ Great Exhibition Prize Goat’s-head Knitting Cord, No. 40, and Embroidering Goat’s-head Cotton, No. 70; mesh, one-third of an inch wide.

This anti-macassar is done in the fashionable style of netting, with a pattern darned on it after it is worked.  Make a foundation, on which work sixty-seven stitches.  Repeat these, backwards and forwards, until a square is done, of as many holes up the sides as along the width.  Remove the foundation, and add either a crochet-bead border all round, or a netted one.  The bead border makes the shape more solid; the netted one is certainly lighter, and the following is very pretty:—­

With a mesh three times the size of that used for the square do one entire round, with three stitches in one at the corners.

2nd round:  With the small mesh.  Miss the first stitch, net the second, then the missed one, repeat all round.

3rd:  X Net a stitch of each of seven stitches, miss one stitch of the last round, X repeat all round.

Observe, before doing this round, count the number of stitches; if they cannot be divided by eight, add at the corners as many as may be required.  Supposing there are so many eights and five over, then three more will be wanted, and one must be added (by doing two in one) in each of the three corners.

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