School, Church, and Home Games eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 130 pages of information about School, Church, and Home Games.

Then the other group goes out and they display their noses.  The group making the largest number of correct guesses wins.

A modification of this game is made by showing the eye through the hole in the sheet instead of the nose, and the group in front of the sheet endeavors to guess whose eye it is.

Trades

The men are lined up on one side of the room.  To each is given three or four buttons, a needle and thread, and a piece of cloth.  They race to see which can sew the buttons in a straight line on the piece of cloth, securely, in the quickest time.

The women are lined up on the opposite side of the room before a plank.  To each is given a hammer and six or eight nails.  They race to see who first can drive the nails into the plank without bending them over.

Rooster

Ten or twenty are as many as can well play this game.  The group is arranged in seats around the room.  The leader starts the game by saying, “My father had a rooster”.  His left hand neighbor says, “A what?” The leader answers, “A rooster”.  The left hand neighbor then turns to his left hand neighbor and says, “My father had a rooster”, and that neighbor says, “A what?”, and his answer is “A rooster”.  This question is asked of each left hand neighbor until it has travelled around the room.  When it becomes the leader’s turn, he again says, “My father had a rooster”, and his left hand neighbor says, “A what?”.  He answers, “A rooster”.  The left hand neighbor says, “Could he crow?” And the leader answers, “Crow he could”.  This dialogue is passed on around the room, each repeating the exact words of the leader to his left hand neighbor.

When it again becomes the leader’s turn, he repeats the dialogue previously used and his left hand neighbor inquires, “How could he crow?” And the leader replies, “Cock-a-doodle-do”, imitating a rooster.  This is passed around the room.  No one is supposed to laugh during the whole game.  Whoever does may either pay a forfeit or is out of the game.  It is well to have a player who knows the game sit next to the leader, so that it may start correctly.

Poor Pussy

The group is arranged in a circle around the room.  One player is selected to be “Pussy” and takes his place in the centre of the group.  He takes a position on all fours before each member of the group, in turn saying “Meow”.  Thereupon the one before whom he is kneeling must stroke the back of his head and say, “Poor pussy”.  Pussy meows three times and in return for each meow has the back of his head stroked and is addressed, “Poor pussy”.  Should the one patting pussy laugh during the performance, he must take pussy’s place.

Gossiping

The group is arranged in a circle around the room.  The leader whispers some information to his left hand neighbor, remembering the exact sentence or sentences.  His left hand neighbor is expected to whisper the same information to the next left hand neighbor and so it is passed around the circle until it is returned to the leader.  The leader then tells what the original sentence was, and tells what it is after passing from ear to ear about the group.

Copyrights
Project Gutenberg
School, Church, and Home Games from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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