Short Story Classics (American) Vol. 2 eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 327 pages of information about Short Story Classics (American) Vol. 2.

WITH AN INTRODUCTION AND NOTES

P. F. Collier & son
new York

Copyright 1905
by P. F. Collier & son
----------------
The use of the copyrighted stories in this collection has been
authorized in every instance by the authors or their representatives.

CONTENTS—­VOLUME II

The brigade commander
   J. W. Deforest

Who was she
   Bayard Taylor

Mademoiselle Olympe Zabriski
   Thomas Bailey Aldrich

Brother Sebastian’s friendship
   Harold Frederic

A good-for-nothing
   Hjalmar Hjorth Boyesen

The idyl of red gulch
   Bret Harte

Crutch, the page
   George Alfred Townsend ("Gath”)

In each other’s shoes
   George Parsons Lathrop

The Denver express
   A. A. Hayes

Jaune D’antimoine
   Thomas Allibone Janvier

Olestracted
   Thomas Nelson page

Our consul at Carlsruhe
   F. J. Stimson ("J.  S. Of Dale”)

The brigade commander
---------------------
by J. W. De forest

_ John William De Forest (born March 36, 1826, in Seymour, Ct.) at the outbreak of the Rebellion abandoned a promising career as a historian and writer of books of travel to enlist in the Union army.  He served throughout the entire war, first as captain, then as major, and so acquired a thorough knowledge of military tactics and the psychology of our war which enabled him, on his return to civil life, to write the best war stories of his generation.  Of these “The Brigade Commander” is Mr. De Forest’s masterpiece.  Solidly grounded on experience, and drawing its emotive power from our greatest national cataclysm, like a Niagara dynamo the story sends us a thrill undiminishing with the increasing distance of its source._

The brigade commander
by J. W. Deforest
[Footnote:  By permission of “The New York Times.”]

The Colonel was the idol of his bragging old regiment and of the bragging brigade which for the last six months he had commanded.  He was the idol, not because he was good and gracious, not because he spared his soldiers or treated them as fellow-citizens, but because he had led them to victory and made them famous.  If a man will win battles and give his brigade a right to brag loudly of its doings, he may have its admiration and even its enthusiastic devotion, though he be as pitiless and as wicked as Lucifer.

Copyrights
Project Gutenberg
Short Story Classics (American) Vol. 2 from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.