Myths That Every Child Should Know eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 383 pages of information about Myths That Every Child Should Know.

CHAPTER PAGE

I. The three golden apples 3
      (Hawthorne’s “Wonder Book”)

II.  The pomegranate seeds 27
      (Hawthorne’s “Tanglewood Tales”)

III.  The chimaera 65
      (Hawthorne’s “Wonder Book”)

IV.  The golden touch 92
      (Hawthorne’s “Wonder Book”)

V. The Gorgon’s head 112
      (Hawthorne’s “Wonder Book”)

VI.  The dragon’s teeth 140
      (Hawthorne’s “Tanglewood Tales”)

VII.  The miraculous pitcher 174
      (Hawthorne’s “Wonder Book”)

VIII.  The paradise of children 107
      (Hawthorne’s “Wonder Book”)

IX.  The cyclops 216
      (Church’s “Stories from Homer”)

X. The argonauts 227
      (Kingsley’s “Greek Heroes”)

XI.  The giant builder 299
      ("In Days of Giants”)

XII.  How Odin lost his eye 308
      ("In Days of Giants”)

XIII.  The quest of the hammer 316
      ("In Days of Giants”)

XIV.  The apples of idun 330
      ("Norse Stories”)

XV.  The death of Balder 337
      ("Norse Stories”)

XVI.  The star and the lily 348
      (Miss Emerson’s “Indian Myths”)

INTRODUCTION

In many parts of the country when the soil is disturbed arrow heads are found.  Now, it is a great many years since arrow heads have been used, and they were never used by the people who own the land in which they appear or by their ancestors.  To explain the presence of these roughly cut pieces of stone we must recall the weapons with which the Indians fought when Englishmen, Frenchmen, Dutchmen, and Spaniards first came to this part of the world.  There may be no authentic history of Indians in the particular locality in which these old-fashioned weapons come to light, but their presence in the ground is the best kind of evidence that Indians once lived on these fields or were in the habit of hunting over them.  In many parts of the country these arrow heads are turned up in great numbers; museums large and small are plentifully supplied with them; and they form part of the record of the men who once lived here, and of their ways of killing game and destroying their enemies.  Wherever there are arrow heads there have been Indians.

Copyrights
Project Gutenberg
Myths That Every Child Should Know from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.