Walker's Appeal, with a Brief Sketch of His Life eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 97 pages of information about Walker's Appeal, with a Brief Sketch of His Life.

[29] See the Declaration of Independence of the United States.

[30] The Lord has not taught the Americans that we will not some day or other throw off their chains and hand-cuffs, from our hands and feet, and their devilish lashes (which some of them shall have enough of yet) from off our backs.

AN ADDRESS

TO THE SLAVES OF THE UNITED
STATES OF AMERICA

(REJECTED BY THE NATIONAL CONVENTION, 1843.)

BY HENRY HIGHLAND GARNET.

PREFACE.

The following Address was first read at the National Convention held at Buffalo, N.Y., in 1843.  Since that time it has been slightly modified, retaining, however, all of its original doctrine.  The document elicited more discussion than any other paper that was ever brought before that, or any other deliberative body of colored persons, and their friends.  Gentlemen who opposed the Address, based their objections on these grounds. 1.  That the document was war-like, and encouraged insurrection; and 2.  That if the Convention should adopt it, that those delegates who lived near the borders of the slave states, would not dare to return to their homes.  The Address was rejected by a small majority; and now in compliance with the earnest request of many who heard it, and in conformity to the wishes of numerous friends who are anxious to see it, the author now gives it to the public, praying God that this little book may be borne on the four winds of heaven, until the principles it contains shall be understood and adopted by every slave in the Union.

H.H.G. 
Troy, N.Y., April 15, 1848.

ADDRESS TO THE SLAVES OF THE U.S.

BRETHREN AND FELLOW CITIZENS: 

Your brethren of the north, east, and west have been accustomed to meet together in National Conventions, to sympathize with each other, and to weep over your unhappy condition.  In these meetings we have addressed all classes of the free, but we have never until this time, sent a word of consolation and advice to you.  We have been contented in sitting still and mourning over your sorrows, earnestly hoping that before this day, your sacred liberties would have been restored.  But, we have hoped in vain.  Years have rolled on, and tens of thousands have been borne on streams of blood, and tears, to the shores of eternity.  While you have been oppressed, we have also been partakers with you; nor can we be free while you are enslaved.  We therefore write to you as being bound with you.

Many of you are bound to us, not only by the ties of a common humanity, but we are connected by the more tender relations of parents, wives, husbands, children, brothers, and sisters, and friends.  As such we most affectionately address you.

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Walker's Appeal, with a Brief Sketch of His Life from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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