The Man Without a Country eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 41 pages of information about The Man Without a Country.

Produced by Kurt A. T. Bodling, Pennsylvania, USA

[Frontispiece caption:] “He cried out, in a fit of frenzy, ’Damn the United States!  I wish I may never hear of the United States again!’”

The Man Without A Country
by
Edward E. Hale
Author of “In His Name,” “Ten Times One,” “How to Live,” etc.

Boston
Little, Brown, and Company

Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1863,
By Ticknor and Fields,
in the Clerk’s Office of the District Court of the District of
Massachusetts.

Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1865,
by Ticknor and Fields,
in the Clerk’s Office of the District Court of the District of
Massachusetts.

Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1865,
by Ticknor and Fields,
in the Clerk’s Office of the District Court of the District of
Massachusetts.

Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1868,
by Ticknor and Fields,
in the Clerk’s Office of the District Court of the District of
Massachusetts.

Entered according to Act of Congress, in the your 1888,
by J. STILMAN Smith & company
in the Office of the Librarian of Congress at Washington.

Copyright, 1891, 1897, 1900, 1904,
by Edward E. Hale.

Copyright, 1898, 1905,
by little, brown, & company.

All rights reserved.

PRINTED IN THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Introduction

Love of country is a sentiment so universal that it is only on such rare occasions as called this book into being that there is any need of discussing it or justifying it.  There is a perfectly absurd statement by Charles Kingsley, in the preface to one of his books, written fifty years ago, in which he says that, while there can be loyalty to a king or a queen, there cannot be loyalty to one’s country.

This story of Philip Nolan was written in the darkest period of the Civil War, to show what love of country is.  There were persons then who thought that if their advice had been taken there need have been no Civil War.  There were persons whose every-day pursuits were greatly deranged by the Civil War.  It proved that the lesson was a lesson gladly received.  I have had letters from seamen who read it as they were lying in our blockade squadrons off the mouths of Southern harbors.  I have had letters from men who read it soon after the Vicksburg campaign.  And in other ways I have had many illustrations of its having been of use in what I have a right to call the darkest period of the Republic.

To-day we are not in the darkest period of the Republic.

Copyrights
Project Gutenberg
The Man Without a Country from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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