The Latin & Irish Lives of Ciaran eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 167 pages of information about The Latin & Irish Lives of Ciaran.

7.  It happened after this that he gave a cauldron belonging to the king, as he had nothing else to give to poor folk asking of him an alms.  When the king heard what had been done, he was greatly enraged, and commanded his people to bring Saint Keranus to him in bonds.  When he was led to the king, he gave sentence that he should be reduced to servitude, and be set apart for grinding at the quern.  But God, having regard to the humiliation of His servant, caused the mill to be moved of itself without human hand, and left Ciaran free to chant his Psalms.  After a few days coppersmiths from the land of the Mumunienses brought three cooking-pots with them, and offered them to Saint Keranus.  Giving thanks for these to God, he was delivered from the yoke of servitude.

XXIII.  THE BLESSING OF CIARAN’S FOOD

8.  When on a certain day he was journeying alone, and the time of partaking of food had come, seeking one to bless for him he said “Benedic.” And as no one answered, he departed, fasting.  On the following day, seeking one to bless and finding him not, he went on fasting in like manner.  On the third day he went forth fasting, and being weary with the journey he lay down; and when he asked a benediction as was customary, a voice came from heaven and blessed his meal, and so, eating and giving thanks, he completed his journey.

XV.  HOW CIARAN REPROVED HIS MOTHER

9.  One time when he was coming from the fields to the house certain strangers met him; and when he had asked them whence they had come, they said, “From the house of Boetius the wright.”  And when he had again asked them how they had been refreshed there, they answered, “Not only got we no food, but the woman of the house heaped insults and abuse upon us.”  But he, fired with the flames of charity, went to his father’s house, and cast whatsoever of food he found there into the mud, thinking that what was not offered to Christ, and that in which the pleasure of the devil was wrought, was corrupt and unclean and should not be eaten of any.

XVI.  THE BREAKING OF THE CARRIAGE-AXLE

10.  At another time when with his father he was sitting in a carriage, the axle of the carriage broke in two; but yet for the whole day they continued their journey safely, without any mishap.

XVII.  HOW CIARAN WENT WITH HIS COW TO THE SCHOOL OF FINDIAN

11.  After these things, having heard the renown of the holiness and sound doctrine of Saint Finnianus of Cluayn Hyrart, he desired to hasten to him as to a living fountain, and asked of his mother a cow, to yield him the food necessary to sustain life.  When his mother refused his request, he went to the kine of his mother, trusting in his God, and blessed one of them in the name of God; and the cow, by the

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The Latin & Irish Lives of Ciaran from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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