A General History and Collection of Voyages and Travels, Volume 16 eBook

Robert Kerr (writer)
This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 658 pages of information about A General History and Collection of Voyages and Travels, Volume 16.
breeze which soon after sprung up, bringing us nearer to the shore, the canoes began to come off in greater numbers; and we had at one time thirty-two of them near the ship, carrying from three to seven or eight persons each, both men and women.  Several of these stood up in their canoes, haranguing and making gestures, after the manner of our first visitors.  One canoe was remarkable for a singular head, which had a bird’s eye and bill, of an enormous size, painted on it; and a person, who was in it, who seemed to be a chief, was no less remarkable for his uncommon appearance; having many feathers hanging from his head, and being painted in an extraordinary manner.[7] He held in his hand a carved bird of wood, as large as a pigeon, with which he rattled as the person first mentioned had done; and was no less vociferous in his harangue, which was attended with some expressive gestures.

[Footnote 6:  The natives of this coast, twelve degrees farther south, also brought feathers as presents to Sir Francis Drake on his arrival.—­See an account of his voyage in Campbell’s edit. of Harris, vol. i. p. 18—­D.  And in this collection, vol. x.—­E.]

[Footnote 7:  Viscaino met with natives on the coast of California, while he was in the harbour of San Diego, who were painted or besmeared with black and white, and had their heads loaded with feathers.—­History of California, vol. ii. p. 272.—­D.]

Though our visitors behaved very peaceably, and could not be suspected of any hostile intention, we could not prevail upon any of them to come on board.  They shewed great readiness, however, to part with any thing they had, and took from us whatever we offered them in exchange, but were more desirous of iron than of any other of our articles of commerce; appearing to be perfectly acquainted with the use of that metal.  Many of the canoes followed us to our anchoring-place; and a group, of about ten or a dozen of them, remained alongside the Resolution most part of the night.

These circumstances gave us a reasonable ground of hope, that we should find this a comfortable station to supply all our wants, and to make us forget the hardships and delays experienced during a constant succession of adverse winds and boisterous weather, almost ever since our arrival upon the coast of America.

CHAPTER IV.

TRANSACTIONS AMONGST THE NATIVES OF NORTH AMERICA; DISCOVERIES ALONG THAT COAST AND THE EASTERN EXTREMITY OF ASIA, NORTHWARD TO ICY CAPE; AND RETURN SOUTHWARD TO THE SANDWICH ISLANDS.

SECTION I.

The Ships enter the Sound, and moor in a Harbour.—­Intercourse with the Natives.—­Articles brought to barter.—­Thefts committed.—­The Observatories erected, and Carpenters set to work.—­Jealousy of the Inhabitants of the Sound to prevent other Tribes having Intercourse with the Ships.—­Stormy and rainy Weather.—­Progress round the Sound.—­Behaviour of the Natives at their Villages.—­Their Manner of drying fish, &c.—­Remarkable Visit from Strangers, and introductory Ceremonies.—­A second Visit to one of the Villages.—­Leave to cut Grass, purchased.—­The Ships sail.—­Presents given and received at parting.

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