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This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 368 pages of information about The Ancient Irish Epic Tale Tin B Calnge.

    [2-2] Stowe, H. 1. 13 and Add.

    [3-3] Stowe, H. 1. 13 and Add.

    [a] See note [d], page 28, supra.

    [4-4] Stowe, H. 1. 13 and Add.

    [5-5] Stowe, H. 1. 13 and Add.

    [6-6] Stowe, H. 1. 13 and Add.

    [7-7] Stowe, H. 1. 13 and Add.

    [8-8] H. 1. 13 and Add.

    [9-9] Add.

* * * * *

[Page 366]

XXIX

[1]ACCOUNT OF THE BROWN BULL OF CUALNGE[1]

[2]A journey of a day and a night the Brown Bull carried the remains of the Whitehorned till he came to the loch that is by Cruachan.  And he came thereout with the loin and the shoulder-blade and the liver of the other on his horns.[2] [W.6168.] It was not long before the men of Erin, as they were there [3]in the company of Ailill and Medb[3] early on the morrow, saw coming over Cruachan from the west the Brown Bull of Cualnge with the Whitehorned of Ai in torn fragments hanging about his ears and horns.  The men of Erin arose, and they knew not which of the bulls it was.  “Come, ye men!” cried Fergus; “leave him alone if it be the Whitehorned that is there; and if it be the Brown of Cualnge, leave him his trophy with him!”

    [1-1] YBL. 41a, 8.

    [2-2] YBL. 53a, 13-16.

    [3-3] H. 1. 13 and Add.

[4]Then it was that the [5]seven[5] Mane arose to take vengeance on the Brown Bull of Cualnge for his violence and his valour.  “Whither go yonder men?” asked Fergus.  “They go to kill the Brown of Cualnge,” [6]said all,[6] “because of his evil deeds."[4] “I pledge my word,” [7]shouted Fergus:[7] “what has already been done in regard to the bulls is a small thing in compare with that which will [W.6179.] now take place, [1]unless with his spoils and victory ye let the Brown of Cualnge go from you into his own land."[1]

    [4-4] Stowe and Add.

    [5-5] Add.

    [6-6] H. 1. 13 and Add.

    [7-7] H. 1. 13, Stowe and Add.

    [1-1] Stowe, H. 1. 13 and Add.

[2]Then the Brown Bull of Cualnge gave forth the three chiefest bellowings of his throat in boast of his triumph, and fear of Fergus held back the men of Erin from attacking the Brown Bull of Cualnge.[2]

    [2-2] H. 1. 13.

[3]Then[3] went the Brown Bull of Cualnge [4]to the west of Cruachan.[4] He turned his right[a] side towards Cruachan, and he left there a heap of the liver [5]of the Whitehorned,[5] so that thence is [6]named[6] Cruachan Ai (’Liver-reeks’).

    [3-3] H. 1. 13 and Add.

    [4-4] H. 1. 13 and Add.

    [a] As a sign of friendliness.

    [5-5] H. 1. 13 and Add.

    [6-6] H. 1. 13 and Add.

[7]Next he [8]came to his own land and[8] reached the river Finnglas (’Whitewater’), and, [9]on coming,[9] he drank a draught from the river, and, so long as he drank the draught, he let not one drop of the river flow by him.  Then he raised his head, and the shoulder-blades of the Whitehorned fell from him in that place.  Hence, Sruthair Finnlethe (’Stream of the White Shoulder-blade’) is the name given to it.[7]

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