The Iliad of Homer eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 499 pages of information about The Iliad of Homer.

THE ILIAD.

BOOK VI.

ARGUMENT OF THE SIXTH BOOK.

The battle is continued.  The Trojans being closely pursued, Hector by the advice of Helenus enters Troy, and recommends it to Hecuba to go in solemn procession to the temple of Minerva; she with the matrons goes accordingly.  Hector takes the opportunity to find out Paris, and exhorts him to return to the field of battle.  An interview succeeds between Hector and Andromache, and Paris, having armed himself in the mean time, comes up with Hector at the close of it, when they sally from the gate together.

BOOK VI.

Thus was the field forsaken by the Gods. 
And now success proved various; here the Greeks
With their extended spears, the Trojans there
Prevail’d alternate, on the champain spread
The Xanthus and the Simois between.[1] 5
First Telamonian Ajax,[2] bulwark firm
Of the Achaians, broke the Trojan ranks,
And kindled for the Greeks a gleam of hope,
Slaying the bravest of the Thracian band,
Huge Acamas, Eusorus’ son; him first 10
Full on the shaggy crest he smote, and urged
The spear into his forehead; through his skull
The bright point pass’d, and darkness veil’d his eyes. 
But Diomede, heroic Chief, the son
Of Teuthras slew, Axylus.[3] Rich was he, 15
And in Arisba (where he dwelt beside
The public road, and at his open door
Made welcome all) respected and beloved. 
But of his numerous guests none interposed
To avert his woful doom; nor him alone 20
He slew, but with him also to the shades
Calesius sent, his friend and charioteer. 
Opheltius fell and Dresus, by the hand
Slain of Euryalus, who, next, his arms
On Pedasus and on AEsepus turned 25
Brethren and twins.  Them Abarbarea bore,
A Naiad, to Bucolion, son renown’d
Of King Laomedon, his eldest born,
But by his mother, at his birth, conceal’d. 
Bucolion pasturing his flocks, embraced 30
The lovely nymph; she twins produced, both whom,
Brave as they were and beautiful, thy son[4]
Mecisteus! slew, and from their shoulders tore
Their armor.  Dauntless Polypoetes slew
Astyalus.  Ulysses with his spear 35
Transfixed Pydites, a Percosian Chief,
And Teucer Aretaoen; Nestor’s pride
Antilochus, with his bright lance, of life
Bereft Ablerus, and the royal arm
Of Agamemnon, Elatus; he dwelt 40
Among the hills of lofty Pedasus,
On Satnio’s banks, smooth-sliding river pure
Phylacus fled, whom Leitus as swift
Soon smote.  Melanthius at the feet expired
Of the renown’d Eurypylus, and, flush’d 45

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The Iliad of Homer from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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