Quincy Adams Sawyer and Mason's Corner Folks eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 437 pages of information about Quincy Adams Sawyer and Mason's Corner Folks.

“In conclusion,” said the orator, “I have one more point to make, and that is a purely personal one.  Some writer has said the end justifies the means, and another writer puts it this way, ’Do evil that good may come.’  In these two sayin’s lies all the justification for many sayin’s and doin’s that can be found; and if I were a conceited man or one inclined to praise my own actions, I should say that the good fortune of many of our distinguished guests this evening, and the handsome financial backin’ that this town has received, are due principally to my personal exertions.”

Here the speaker paused again and wiped his forehead, which was bedewed with perspiration.

“Good Lord!” said Mrs. Hawkins to Olive Green, who sat next to her, “to hear that man talk anybuddy would think that nobuddy else in the town ever did anything.”

“To conclude,” said the speaker, “I don’t wish, feller citizens, to have you understand that I am defendin’ my actions.  They were mean in spirit and mean in the way in which they were done, but the one against whom they were directed returned good for evil, and heaped coals of fire on my head.  At a time when events made me think he was my greatest enemy, he became my greatest friend.  It is to his assistance, advice, and influence that I owe the present honorable position that I hold in this town, and here to-night, in his presence, and in the presence of you all, I have made this confession to show that I am truly repentant for the past.  At the same time, I cannot help rejoicing in the good fortune that those misdeeds were the means of securin’ for us all.”

As the speaker sat down, overcome with emotion, he was greeted with applause, which was redoubled when Mr. Sawyer arose in his seat.  But when Quincy leaned forward and extended his hand to Strout, which the latter took, the excitement rose to fever heat, and cheers for Quincy Adams Sawyer and Obadiah Strout resounded throughout the hall and fell upon the evening air.  This time the band played “The Star Spangled Banner.”

Again the toastmaster arose and said, “Ladies and gentlemen, the first toast that I am going to propose to-night is a double one, because, for obvious reasons, it must include not only the State, but its chief representative, who is with us here to-night.  Ladies and gentlemen, let us drink to the Old Bay State, and may each loyal heart say within itself, ‘God save the Commonwealth of Massachusetts!’” The guests touched their lips to their glasses.  “And now,” continued the toastmaster, “to his Excellency Quincy Adams Sawyer, Governor of the Commonwealth, whom I have the honor of introducing to you.”

The Governor arose amid wild applause and loud acclamations, while the band played “Hail to the Chief!”

The end.

$Hope Hathaway$

IS ANOTHER STRONG WESTERN STORY OF MONTANA RANCH LIFE BY THE AUTHOR OF “Marie of the Lower Ranch,” AND WITH EACH COPY THE PUBLISHERS ARE GIVING

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Project Gutenberg
Quincy Adams Sawyer and Mason's Corner Folks from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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