Pinnock's improved edition of Dr. Goldsmith's History of Rome eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 453 pages of information about Pinnock's improved edition of Dr. Goldsmith's History of Rome.

27.  What became of the Tarentines?

28.  To whom did they have recourse?

29.  How did this terminate?

FOOTNOTES: 

[1] An additional instance of the severity with which military discipline was maintained among the Romans, happened a short time previous to this:  L. Papir’ius Cursor, the dictator, having occasion to quit the army and repair to Rome, strictly forbade Q. Fa’bius Rullia’nus, his master of the horse, to venture a battle in his absence.  This order Fa’bius disobeyed, and gained a complete victory.  Instead, however, of finding success a palliation of his offence, he was immediately condemned by the stern dictator to expiate his breach of discipline by death.  In spite of the mutinous disposition of the army—­in spite of the intercessions and threats, both of the senate and people, Papir’ius persisted in his resolution:  but what menaces and powerful interposition could not obtain, was granted to the prayers and tears of the criminal’s relatives; and Fa’bius lived to fill some of the highest offices of the state, with honour to himself and infinite advantage to his country. (Liv. l. 8. c. 30. 35.)

[2] This gives but an indifferent idea of the military skill of those ages.

[3] It appears, however, to have suffered a diminution of its honour on this occasion, by breaking every article of the treaty of peace extorted from Posthu’mius.  As some atonement for this breach of faith, they delivered Posthu’mius, and those who signed the treaty, into the hands of the Samnites, to do with them as they thought fit; but this generous people instantly set them at liberty.  Liv. l. 9. c. 8-11.

[4] U.C. 447.  About this time Appius Claudius, the censor, constructed an aqueduct, seven miles long, for supplying Rome with water, and that famous road from Rome to Capua, which still remains, the admiration of all Europe.

[5] Epi’rus, a country situated between Macedonia, Achaia, and the Ionian sea. (Strabo.)

[6] Demos’thenes, famous for his bold and nervous style of oratory, flourished at Athens about 320 years before the Christian era.

[7] Taren’tum, now Taren’to, was a town of Calabria, in Italy, situate on a bay of the same name, near the mouth of the river Gale’sus:  it was celebrated for its fine harbour. (Strabo.)

[8] Cin’eas is said to have possessed so retentive a memory, that the day after his arrival at Rome, he could salute every senator and knight by name.

* * * * *

CHAPTER XIV.

SECTION I.

FROM THE BEGINNING OF THE FIRST PUNIC WAR, TO THE BEGINNING OF THE SECOND, WHEN THE ROMANS BEGAN TO GROW POWERFUL BY SEA.—­U.C. 493.

                            In every heart
  Are sown the sparks that kindle fiery war,
  Occasion needs but fan them, and they blaze.—­Cowper.

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Pinnock's improved edition of Dr. Goldsmith's History of Rome from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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