The English Gipsies and Their Language eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 247 pages of information about The English Gipsies and Their Language.

Yeckorus, boot hundred beshes the divvus acai, a juva was wellin’ to chore a yora.  “Mukk mandy hatch,” penned the yora, “an’ I’ll sikker tute ki tute can lel a tikno pappni.”  So the juva lelled the tikno pappni, and it pookered laki, “Mukk mandy jal an’ I’ll sikker tute ki tute can chore a bori kani.”  Then she chored the bori kani, an’ it shelled avree, “Mukk mandy jal an’ I’ll sikker tute ki you can loure a rani-chillico.”  And when she lelled the rani-chillico, it penned, “Mukk mandy jal an’ I’ll sikker tute odoi ki tute can lel a guruvni’s tikno.”  So she lelled the guruvni’s tikno, an’ it shokkered and ruvved, an’ rakkered, “Mukk mandy jal an’ I’ll sikker tute where to lel a fino grai.”  An’ when she loured the grai, it penned laki, “Mukk mandy jal an’ I’ll rikker tute to a kushto-dick barvelo rye who kaums a pirreny.”  So she lelled the kushto tauno rye, an’ she jivved with lester kushto yeck cooricus; but pash dovo he pookered her to jal avree, he didn’t kaum her kekoomi.  “Sa a wafro mush is tute,” ruvved the rakli, “to bitcher mandy avree!  For tute’s cammoben I delled avree a yora, a tikno pappni, a boro kani, a rani-chillico, a guruvni’s tikno, an’ a fino grai.”  “Is dovo tacho?” putched the raklo. “’Pre my mullo dadas!” sovahalled the rakli,” I del ‘em sar apre for tute, yeck paul the waver, an’ kenna tu bitchers mandy avree!” “So ’p mi-Duvel!” penned the rye, “if tute nashered sar booti covvas for mandy, I’ll rummer tute.”  So they were rummobend.

Avali, there’s huckeny (hokkeny) tachobens and tacho huckabens.  You can sovahall pre the lil adovo.

TRANSLATION.

Once, many hundred years ago (to-day now), a girl was going to steal an egg.  “Let me be,” said the egg, “and I will show you where you can get a duck.”  So the girl got the duck, and it said (told) to her, “Let me go and I will show you where you can get a goose” (large hen).  Then she stole the goose, and it cried out, “Let me go and I’ll show you where you can steal a turkey” (lady-bird).  And when she took the turkey, it said, “Let me go and I’ll show you where you can get a calf.”  So she got the calf, and it bawled and wept, and cried, “Let me go and I’ll show you where to get a fine horse.”  And when she stole the horse, it said to her, “Let me go and I’ll carry you to a handsome, rich gentleman who wants a sweetheart.”  So she got the nice young gentleman, and lived with him pleasantly one week; but then he told her to go away, he did not want her any more.  “What a bad man you are,” wept the girl, “to send me away!  For your sake I gave away an egg, a duck, a goose, a turkey, a calf, and a fine horse.”  “Is that true?” asked the youth.  “By my dead father!” swore the girl, “I gave them all up for you, one after the other, and now you send me away!” “So help me God!” said the gentleman, “if you lost so many things for me, I’ll marry you.”  So they were married.

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The English Gipsies and Their Language from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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