The English Gipsies and Their Language eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 247 pages of information about The English Gipsies and Their Language.

GUDLO XXVI.  THE GIPSY FIDDLER AND THE YOUNG LADY.

Yeckorus a tano mush was kellin’ kushto pre the boshomengro, an’ a kushti dickin rani pookered him, “Tute’s killaben is as sano as best-tood.”  And he rakkered ajaw, “Tute’s mui’s gudlo sar pishom, an’ I’d cammoben to puraben mi tood for tute’s pishom.”

Kushto pash kushto kairs ferridearer.

TRANSLATION.

Once a young man was playing well upon the violin, and a beautiful lady told him, “Your playing is as soft as cream.”  And he answered, “Your mouth (i.e., lips or words) is sweet as honey, and I would like to exchange my cream for your honey.”

Good with good makes better.

GUDLO XXVII.  HOW THE GIPSY DANCED A HOLE THROUGH A STONE.

Yeckorus some plochto Rommany chals an’ juvas were kellin’ the pash-divvus by dood tall’ a boro ker, and yeck penned the waver, “I’d be cammoben if dovo ker was mandy’s.”  And the rye o’ the ker, kun sus dickin’ the kellaben, rakkered, “When tute kells a hev muscro the bar you’re hatchin’ apre, mandy’ll del tute the ker.”  Adoi the Rom tarried the bar apre, an’ dicked it was hollow tale, and sar a curro ’pre the waver rikk.  So he lelled dui sastern chokkas and kelled sar the ratti ‘pre the bar, kairin’ such a gudlo you could shoon him a mee avree; an’ adree the sala he had kaired a hev adree the bar as boro as lesters sherro.  So the barvelo rye del him the fino ker, and sar the mushis got matto, hallauter kettenus.

Many a cheirus I’ve shooned my puri dye pen that a bar with a hev adree it kairs kammoben.

TRANSLATION.

Once some jolly Gipsy men and girls were dancing in the evening by moonlight before a great house, and one said to the other, “I’d be glad if that house was mine.”  And the gentleman of the house, who was looking at the dancing, said, “When you dance a hole through (in the centre of) the stone you are standing on, I’ll give you the house.”  Then the Gipsy pulled the stone up, and saw it was hollow underneath, and like a cup on the other side.  So he took two iron shoes and danced all night on the stone, making such a noise you could hear him a mile off; and in the morning he had made a hole in the stone as large as his head.  So the rich gentleman gave him the fine house, and all the people got drunk, all together.

Many a time I’ve heard my old mother say that a stone with a hole in it brings luck.

GUDLO XXVIII.  STORY OF THE GENTLEMAN AND THE GIPSY.

Yeckorus a boro rye wouldn’t mukk a choro, pauvero, chovveny Rommany chal hatch odoi ’pre his farm.  So the Rommany chal jalled on a puv apre the waver rikk o’ the drum, anerjal the ryas beshaben.  And dovo ratti the ryas ker pelled alay; kek kash of it hatched apre, only the foki that loddered adoi hullered their kokeros avree ma their miraben.  And the ryas tikno chavo would a-mullered if a Rommany juva had not lelled it avree their pauveri bitti tan.

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The English Gipsies and Their Language from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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