Poems eBook

Denis Florence MacCarthy
This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 197 pages of information about Poems.
And swarming roads, and there on solitudes
That only hear the torrent, and the wind,
And eagle’s shriek.  There is a precipice
That seems a fragment of some mighty wall,
Built by the hand that fashioned the old world,
To separate its nations, and thrown down
When the flood drowned them.  To the north, a path
Conducts you up the narrow battlement. 
Steep is the western side, shaggy and wild
With mossy trees, and pinnacles of flint,
And many a hanging crag.  But, to the east,
Sheer to the vale go down the bare old cliffs,—­
Huge pillars, that in middle heaven upbear
Their weather-beaten capitals, here dark
With the thick moss of centuries, and there
Of chalky whiteness where the thunderbolt
Has splintered them.  It is a fearful thing
To stand upon the beetling verge, and see
Where storm and lightning, from that huge gray wall,
Have tumbled down vast blocks, and at the base
Dashed them in fragments, and to lay thine ear
Over the dizzy depth, and hear the sound
Of winds, that struggle with the woods below,
Come up like ocean murmurs.  But the scene
Is lovely round; a beautiful river there
Wanders amid the fresh and fertile meads,
The paradise he made unto himself,
Mining the soil for ages.  On each side
The fields swell upward to the hills; beyond,
Above the hills, in the blue distance, rise
The mighty columns with which earth props heaven.

There is a tale about these reverend rocks,
A sad tradition of unhappy love,
And sorrows borne and ended, long ago,
When over these fair vales the savage sought
His game in the thick woods.  There was a maid,
The fairest of the Indian maids, bright-eyed,
With wealth of raven tresses, a light form,
And a gay heart.  About her cabin-door
The wide old woods resounded with her song
And fairy laughter all the summer day. 
She loved her cousin; such a love was deemed,
By the morality of those stern tribes,
Incestuous, and she struggled hard and long
Against her love, and reasoned with her heart,
As simple Indian maiden might.  In vain. 
Then her eye lost its lustre, and her step
Its lightness, and the gray-haired men that passed
Her dwelling, wondered that they heard no more
The accustomed song and laugh of her, whose looks
Were like the cheerful smile of Spring, they said,
Upon the Winter of their age.  She went
To weep where no eye saw, and was not found
When all the merry girls were met to dance,
And all the hunters of the tribe were out;
Nor when they gathered from the rustling husk
The shining ear; nor when, by the river’s side,
Thay pulled the grape and startled the wild shades
With sounds of mirth.  The keen-eyed Indian dames
Would whisper to each other, as they saw
Her wasting form, and say the girl will die.

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Project Gutenberg
Poems from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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