Talks To Teachers On Psychology; And To Students On Some Of Life's Ideals eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 182 pages of information about Talks To Teachers On Psychology; And To Students On Some Of Life's Ideals.

“That he had been lately sent into Burgundy to buy the provision of wine for the society, which was a very unwelcome task for him, because he had no turn for business, and because he was lame, and could not go about the boat but by rolling himself over the casks.  That, however, he gave himself no uneasiness about it, nor about the purchase of the wine.  That he said to God, ‘It was his business he was about,’ and that he afterward found it well performed.  That he had been sent into Auvergne, the year before, upon the same account; that he could not tell how the matter passed, but that it proved very well.”

“So, likewise, in his business in the kitchen (to which he had naturally a great aversion), having accustomed himself to do everything there for the love of God, and with prayer upon all occasions, for his grace to do his work well, he had found everything easy during fifteen years that he had been employed there.”

“That he was very well pleased with the post he was now in, but that he was as ready to quit that as the former, since he was always pleasing himself in every condition, by doing little things for the love of God.”

“That the goodness of God assured him he would not forsake him utterly, and that he would give him strength to bear whatever evil he permitted to happen to him; and, therefore, that he feared nothing, and had no occasion to consult with anybody about his state.  That, when he had attempted to do it, he had always come away more perplexed.”

The simple-heartedness of the good Brother Lawrence, and the relaxation of all unnecessary solicitudes and anxieties in him, is a refreshing spectacle.

* * * * *

The need of feeling responsible all the livelong day has been preached long enough in our New England.  Long enough exclusively, at any rate,—­and long enough to the female sex.  What our girl-students and woman-teachers most need nowadays is not the exacerbation, but rather the toning-down of their moral tensions.  Even now I fear that some one of my fair hearers may be making an undying resolve to become strenuously relaxed, cost what it will, for the remainder of her life.  It is needless to say that that is not the way to do it.  The way to do it, paradoxical as it may seem, is genuinely not to care whether you are doing it or not.  Then, possibly, by the grace of God, you may all at once find that you are doing it, and, having learned what the trick feels like, you may (again by the grace of God) be enabled to go on.

And that something like this may be the happy experience of all my hearers is, in closing, my most earnest wish.

II.  ON A CERTAIN BLINDNESS IN HUMAN BEINGS

Our judgments concerning the worth of things, big or little, depend on the feelings the things arouse in us.  Where we judge a thing to be precious in consequence of the idea we frame of it, this is only because the idea is itself associated already with a feeling.  If we were radically feelingless, and if ideas were the only things our mind could entertain, we should lose all our likes and dislikes at a stroke, and be unable to point to any one situation or experience in life more valuable or significant than any other.

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Talks To Teachers On Psychology; And To Students On Some Of Life's Ideals from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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