Harvard Psychological Studies, Volume 1 eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 678 pages of information about Harvard Psychological Studies, Volume 1.

The mean variations of the table (Table VI.) were calculated as follows:  The average for all the elements of the stanza was obtained and an average foot constructed (excluding the last sonant and the pause of the verse).  From this average foot the variations of all the first feet were computed, then the variations of all the second feet, etc.  Then the variations of the first feet of the stanza were averaged and percentages taken, etc.; it is this last value which goes to the making up of the tables.  In inspecting the averages the corresponding elements of the feet should be compared.  Any increased length due to a prescribed accent within the verse, etc., appears in the averages as a corresponding increase in the mean variation at that point, and only the first and last feet can be compared as to the variations in the verse as a whole.  In making up the tables the material was grouped, not by combining the records of each subject, but by combining all the stanzas of a single type, in order to eliminate individual peculiarities.

TABLE VII.

Verse pauses in unrhymed stanzas, together with the foot pause
within the verse.  Length of last foot, together with the
average foot within the verse: 

Average first Last foot Average of first Verse Pause.
3 feet of verse. of verse. 3 foot pauses
of verse. 
Iambs: 
36 56.5 24 45.5
57 122 35 100
68.5 125 45 102
63.5 111.5 42 93
63.5 117.5 39 93.5
66 135 42 110
53.5 59 40 45
60 76 45 61
56.5 68 41 54
55.5 56 39 41
53 53.5 37 41.5
56 73 34 45
85 98 56 54
39 50 26.5 36
37 43 17 30
42.5 45 28 30
38.5 49 26 36
40 79 26 55
31 72.5 21 55
33 66 23 54
33 76 22 64
Dactyls, catalectic: 
56 63 (The pauses cannot be
60 62 compared because of the
55 66 omission of elements in
51.5 76 the final foot.)
37 40
55 58.5
53 59.5
40 73
38 65
37.5 56
37 73

Throughout the series of measurements made the accented element was nearly always longer, and in no case did the accent fail to increase the length of the sonant.  Ebhardt’s suggestion that there are two significant parts in each foot-element, viz., sonant and pause, does not seem good.  Although the sonant is much longer when accented, the ratio between the sonant and the following interval is not definite.

Copyrights
Project Gutenberg
Harvard Psychological Studies, Volume 1 from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
Follow Us on Facebook